Sharon O'Kane

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In man and domestic animals, scarring in the skin after trauma, surgery, burn or sports injury is a major medical problem, often resulting in adverse aesthetics, loss of function, restriction of tissue movement and/or growth and adverse psychological effects. Current treatments are empirical, unreliable and unpredictable: there are no prescription drugs for(More)
BACKGROUND Research into mechanisms of skin scarring identified transforming growth factor beta3 (TGFbeta3) as a potential antiscarring therapy. We assessed scar improvement with avotermin (recombinant, active, human TGFbeta3). METHODS In three double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, intradermal avotermin (concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 500 ng/100(More)
We have investigated the effect of scarring at a site of peripheral nerve repair by comparing regeneration of the sciatic nerve in normal mice and two transgenic strains with an increased or decreased propensity for scarring. The outcome was assessed by quantifying collagen at the repair site, recording compound action potentials and counting myelinated(More)
Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta3) gene disruption causes cleft secondary palate. Pax9 and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) genes are involved in the patterning of vertebrate embryonic tissues, including the facial skeleton. We investigated the expression of Pax9 and Shh genes during normal mouse palate development and in the developing cleft palates of(More)
Scarring in the skin after trauma, surgery, burn or sports injury is a major medical problem, often resulting in loss of function, restriction of tissue movement and adverse psychological effects. Whilst various studies have utilised a range of model systems that have increased our understanding of the pathways and processes underlying scar formation, they(More)
Many patients are dissatisfied with scars on both visible and non-visible body sites and would value any opportunity to improve or minimise scarring following surgery. Approximately 44 million procedures in the US and 42 million procedures in the EU per annum could benefit from scar reduction therapy. A wide range of non-invasive and invasive techniques(More)
Chronic wounds or ulcers are wounds that do not heal in the usual manner. This type of wound is most common in the elderly and in paraplegic patients with an estimated 1% of the population suffering from leg ulcers and the costs adding up to 4% of the annual National Health Service budget in the U.K. There is an identified need to develop a device capable(More)
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