Sharlene Cam

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The capacity for aerial maneuvering was likely a major influence on the evolution of flying animals. Here we evaluate consequences of paravian morphology for aerial performance by quantifying static stability and control effectiveness of physical models for numerous taxa sampled from within the lineage leading to birds (Paraves). Results of aerodynamic(More)
Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching to 14 days-post-hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1 to 8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that(More)
Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching through 14 days-post-hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1–8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that(More)
The capacity for aerial maneuvering shaped the evolution of flying animals. Here we evaluate consequences of aviaian morphology for aerial performance (1,2) by quantifying static stability and control effectiveness of physical models (3) for numerous taxa sampled from within the lineage leading to birds (Avialae, 4). Results of aerodynamic testing are(More)
The capacity for aerial maneuvering was likely a major influence on the evolution of flying animals. Here we evaluate consequences of paravian morphology for aerial performance (Dudley and Yanoviak, 2011; Smith, 1952) by quantifying static stability and control effectiveness of physical models (Evangelista et al., 2014) for numerous taxa sampled from within(More)
Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa, Panama; current address Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC The(More)
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