Shanaka R. Gunawardena

Learn More
CONTEXT Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Identification of gene carriers currently relies on germline analysis in patients with MMR-deficient tumors, but criteria to select individuals in whom tumor MMR testing should be performed are unclear.(More)
PURPOSE To determine whether cancer risks for carriers and noncarriers from families with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation are increased above the risks of the general population. PATIENTS AND METHODS We prospectively followed a cohort of 446 unaffected carriers of an MMR gene mutation (MLH1, n = 161; MSH2, n = 222; MSH6, n = 47; and PMS2, n = 16)(More)
BACKGROUND Colorectal cancer (CRC) in densely affected families without Lynch Syndrome may be due to mutations in undiscovered genetic loci. Familial linkage analyses have yielded disparate results; the use of exome sequencing in coding regions may identify novel segregating variants. METHODS We completed exome sequencing on 40 affected cases from 16(More)
Double heterozygotes for mutations in APC and a DNA mismatch repair gene are extremely rare. We report on an individual who had truncating mutations in APC and MLH1 whose clinical presentation initially resembled Familial Adenomatous Polyposis but then emerged as a novel phenotype with multiple jejunal carcinomas. We have reviewed the relevant literature on(More)
BACKGROUND Mutations in several genes predispose to colorectal cancer. Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes was previously limited to single gene tests; thus, only a very limited number of genes were tested, and rarely those infrequently mutated in colorectal cancer. Next-generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to(More)
  • 1