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BACKGROUND The recent series of reviews conducted within the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD) addressed epidemiology of the two deadly diseases at the global and regional level; it also estimated the effectiveness of interventions, barriers to achieving high coverage and the main implications for health policy. The aim of this paper is(More)
Despite the existence of low-cost and effective interventions for childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea, these conditions remain two of the leading killers of young children. Based on feedback from health professionals in countries with high child mortality, in 2009, WHO and Unicef began conceptualising an integrated approach for pneumonia and diarrhoea(More)
BACKGROUND The annual number of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths due to severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in young children worldwide is unknown. We aimed to estimate the incidence of admissions and deaths for such infections in children younger than 5 years in 2010. METHODS We estimated the incidence of admissions for severe and(More)
BACKGROUND WHO case management guidelines for severe pneumonia involve referral to hospital for treatment with parenteral antibiotics. If equally as effective as parenteral treatment, home-based oral antibiotic treatment could reduce referral, admission, and treatment costs. Our aim was to determine whether home treatment with high-dose oral amoxicillin and(More)
Pneumonia is the leading cause of child mortality globally. Community case management (CCM) of pneumonia by community health workers is a feasible, effective strategy to complement facility-based management for areas that lack access to facilities. We surveyed experts in the 57 African and Asian countries with the highest levels and rates of childhood(More)
WHO recommendations for early antimicrobial treatment of childhood pneumonia have been effective in reducing childhood mortality, but the last major revision was over 10 years ago. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance, new pneumonia pathogens, and new drugs have prompted WHO to assemble an international panel to review the literature on childhood(More)
BACKGROUND Bacterial infections are a leading cause of the 2·9 million annual neonatal deaths. Treatment is usually based on clinical diagnosis of possible severe bacterial infection (pSBI). To guide programme planning, we have undertaken the first estimates of neonatal pSBI, by sex and by region, for sub-Saharan Africa, south Asia, and Latin America. (More)
Management of HIV-infected and exposed children is challenging for health workers in primary care settings. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) is a WHO/UNICEF strategy for improving morbidity and mortality in under 5 children attending first level facilities in developing countries. In high HIV-prevalence settings, IMCI includes an HIV(More)
BACKGROUND The current World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation for treatment of severe infection in young infants is hospitalization and parenteral antibiotic therapy. Hospital care is generally not available outside large cities in low- and middle-income countries and even when available is not acceptable or affordable for many families. Previous(More)
BACKGROUND Multidrug resistance (MDR), specifically to ampicillin and chloramphenicol, has complicated the treatment of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis. This is worsened by use of prior antibiotics, which limits identification of the causative agent by culture and increases reliance on antigen detection. OBJECTIVE We aimed to develop a PCR(More)