Learn More
Plagues of mass migrating insects such as locusts are estimated to affect the livelihood of one in ten people on the planet [1]. Identification of generalities in the mechanisms underlying these mass movements will enhance our understanding of animal migration and collective behavior while potentially contributing to pest-management efforts. We provide(More)
In order to move effectively in unpredictable or heterogeneous environments animals must make appropriate decisions in response to internal and external cues. Identifying the link between these components remains a challenge for movement ecology and is important in understanding the mechanisms driving both individual and collective motion. One accessible(More)
Animals can exhibit complex movement patterns that may be the result of interactions with their environment or may be directly the mechanism by which their behaviour is governed. In order to understand the drivers of these patterns we examine the movement behaviour of individual desert locusts in a homogenous experimental arena with minimal external cues.(More)
Cannibalism has been shown to be important to the collective motion of mass migratory bands of insects, such as locusts and Mormon crickets. These mobile groups consist of millions of individuals and are highly destructive to vegetation. Individuals move in response to attacks from approaching conspecifics and bite those ahead, resulting in further movement(More)
Animal aggregations are widespread in nature and can exhibit complex emergent properties not found at an individual level. We investigate one such example here, collective vortex formation by congeneric spadefoot toad tadpoles: Spea bombifrons and Spea multiplicata. Tadpoles of these species develop into either an omnivorous or a carnivorous (cannibalistic)(More)
  • 1