Seo-Kyung Chung

Learn More
Hyperekplexia is a rare, but potentially fatal, neuromotor disorder characterized by exaggerated startle reflexes and hypertonia in response to sudden, unexpected auditory or tactile stimuli. This disorder is primarily caused by inherited mutations in the genes encoding the glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha1 subunit (GLRA1) and the presynaptic glycine(More)
Polymicrogyria and lissencephaly are causally heterogeneous disorders of cortical brain development, with distinct neuropathological and neuroimaging patterns. They can be associated with additional structural cerebral anomalies, and recurrent phenotypic patterns have led to identification of recognizable syndromes. The lissencephalies are usually(More)
Tubulins, and microtubule polymers into which they incorporate, play critical mechanical roles in neuronal function during cell proliferation, neuronal migration, and postmigrational development: the three major overlapping events of mammalian cerebral cortex development. A number of neuronally expressed tubulin genes are associated with a spectrum of(More)
Hyperekplexia is a syndrome of readily provoked startle responses, alongside episodic and generalized hypertonia, that presents within the first month of life. Inhibitory glycine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels with a definitive and clinically well stratified linkage to hyperekplexia. Most hyperekplexia cases are caused by mutations in(More)
BACKGROUND Sequencing or denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) analysis of the known genes associated with the long QT syndrome (LQTS) fails to identify mutations in approximately 25% of subjects with inherited LQTS. Large gene deletions and duplications can be missed with these methodologies. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to(More)
Hyperekplexia is a human neurological disorder characterized by an excessive startle response and is typically caused by missense and nonsense mutations in the gene encoding the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha1 subunit (GLRA1). Genetic heterogeneity has been confirmed in rare sporadic cases, with mutations affecting other postsynaptic glycinergic(More)
Congenital hyperekplexia is a rare, potentially treatable neuromotor disorder. Three major genes of effect are known, and all three affect glycinergic neurotransmission. Two genes encode for subunits of the postsynaptic inhibitory glycine receptor, GLRA1 encoding the α1 subunit and GLRB encoding the β subunit. The third, SLC6A5, encodes the cognate(More)
Human startle disease, also known as hyperekplexia (OMIM 149400), is a paroxysmal neurological disorder caused by defects in glycinergic neurotransmission. Hyperekplexia is characterised by an exaggerated startle reflex in response to tactile or acoustic stimuli which first presents as neonatal hypertonia, followed in some with episodes of life-threatening(More)
Glycinergic neurotransmission is a major inhibitory influence in the CNS and its disruption triggers a paediatric and adult startle disorder, hyperekplexia. The postsynaptic α(1)-subunit (GLRA1) of the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) and the cognate presynaptic glycine transporter (SLC6A5/GlyT2) are well-established genes of effect in hyperekplexia.(More)
Hereditary hyperekplexia or startle disease is characterized by an exaggerated startle response, evoked by tactile or auditory stimuli, leading to hypertonia and apnea episodes. Missense, nonsense, frameshift, splice site mutations, and large deletions in the human glycine receptor α1 subunit gene (GLRA1) are the major known cause of this disorder. However,(More)