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Multicellular animals match costly activities, such as growth and reproduction, to the environment through nutrient-sensing pathways. The insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) pathway plays key roles in growth, metabolism, stress resistance, reproduction, and longevity in diverse organisms including mammals. Invertebrate genomes often contain multiple genes encoding(More)
An expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A fundamental question is whether toxicity is driven by the repeat RNA itself and/or by dipeptide repeat proteins generated by repeat-associated, non-ATG translation. To address this question, we developed in vitro and in vivo(More)
Energy homeostasis, a fundamental property of all organisms, depends on the ability to control the storage and mobilization of fat, mainly triacylglycerols (TAG), in special organs such as mammalian adipose tissue or the fat body of flies. Malregulation of energy homeostasis underlies the pathogenesis of obesity in mammals including human. We performed a(More)
Energy homeostasis is a fundamental property of animal life, providing a genetically fixed balance between fat storage and mobilization. The importance of body fat regulation is emphasized by dysfunctions resulting in obesity and lipodystrophy in humans. Packaging of storage fat in intracellular lipid droplets, and the various molecules and mechanisms(More)
In Drosophila, the masses and sheets of adipose tissue that are distributed throughout the fly are collectively called the fat body. Like mammalian adipocytes, insect fat body cells provide the major energy reserve of the animal organism. Both cell types accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG) in intracellular lipid droplets; this finding suggests that the(More)
Drosophila melanogaster curled, one of the first fly mutants described by T. H. Morgan >90 years ago, is the founding member of a series of curled wing phenotype mutants widely used as markers in fruit fly genetics. The expressivity of the wing phenotype is environmentally modulated, suggesting that the mutation affects the metabolic status of cells rather(More)
Sleep fragmentation, particularly reduced and interrupted night sleep, impairs the quality of life of older people. Strikingly similar declines in sleep quality are seen during ageing in laboratory animals, including the fruit fly Drosophila. We investigated whether reduced activity of the nutrient- and stress-sensing insulin/insulin-like growth factor(More)
Defense against oxidative stress in mammals includes the regeneration of the major thiol reductants glutathione and thioredoxin by glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), respectively. In contrast, Drosophila, and possibly insects in general, lacks glutathione reductase and must rely solely on the TrxR system. The mammalian TrxRs described(More)
Regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) expression is critical for the control of oxidative phosphorylation in response to physiological demand, and this regulation is often impaired in disease and aging. We have previously shown that mitochondrial transcription termination factor 3 (MTERF3) is a key regulator that represses mtDNA transcription in the(More)
The bicoid stability factor (BSF) of Drosophila melanogaster has been reported to be present in the cytoplasm, where it stabilizes the maternally contributed bicoid mRNA and binds mRNAs expressed from early zygotic genes. BSF may also have other roles, as it is ubiquitously expressed and essential for survival of adult flies. We have performed(More)