Sebastião de Sousa Almeida

Learn More
In order to study the functional consequences of brain changes caused by early malnutrition, rats were fed a protein-deficient diet from birth until 49 days of age and a balanced diet from day 50 to day 70. The animals were submitted to a step-down inhibitory avoidance task and to the flinch-jump nociceptive test at 49 and 70 days of age. Malnourished rats(More)
Two animal models of pain were used to study the effects of short-term protein malnutrition and environmental stimulation on the response threshold to aversive stimuli. Eighty male Wistar rats were used. Half of the pups were submitted to malnutrition by feeding their mothers a 6% protein diet from 0 to 21 days of age while the mothers of the other half(More)
The present study investigated the effects of early protein malnutrition on the spatial learning and memory processes. The consequences of malnutrition for the cholinergic system were evaluated by comparing the performance of malnourished and control animals in the Morris water maze after treatment with scopolamine. The learning test consisted of placing(More)
In order to investigate the effects of early protein malnutrition and environmental stimulation upon the response to the anxiolytic properties of diazepam, two animal models of anxiety (elevated plus-maze and light-dark transition tests) were used. Rats were malnourished by feeding their dams a 6% protein diet during the lactation period (0-21 days of age)(More)
Protein malnutrition induces structural, neurochemical and functional changes in the central nervous system leading to alterations in cognitive and behavioral development of rats. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of postnatal protein malnutrition on learning and memory tasks. Previously malnourished (6% protein) and well-nourished rats(More)
In order to investigate whether early malnutrition causes lasting changes in the reactivity to anxiolytic drugs, rat dams during lactation (21 days) and pups after weaning until the 49th day of life were fed on 8% casein diet (M rats), while their well-nourished controls received 25% casein (W rats). From day 50 on all animals ate the same balanced diet.(More)
To study the effects of prenatal protein deficiency in the exploration of the elevated plus-maze, an ethological procedure was used. Female rats were provided with 25% (control) or with 6% (low-protein) casein diets before and during pregnancy. After birth eight pups in each litter (six males and two females) were fostered to a control mother. After weaning(More)
The effects of prenatal protein malnutrition on juvenile social behavior was investigated in male and female rats. Animals were provided with 25% (control) or 6% (low protein) casein diets before and during pregnancy. After birth eight pups in each litter (six males and two females) were fostered to lactating control mothers. After weaning (21 days of age)(More)
There is a well-established body of data demonstrating that protein or protein-calorie malnutrition experienced early in life is associated with neuroanatomical, neurochemical, as well as behavioral alterations in both animals and humans. A number of studies has focused on the following question: are the neuroanatomical and/or neurochemical changes produced(More)
An elevated T-maze was used to study the effects of prenatal protein deficiency on inhibitory avoidance and escape behaviors. Female rats were provided with a 25% (control) or a 6% (low protein) casein diets before and during pregnancy. After birth, eight pups in each litter (six males and two females) were fostered to a lactating well-nourished mother.(More)