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The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily encompasses a large group of growth and differentiation factors playing important roles in regulating embryonic development and in maintaining tissue homeostasis in adult animals. Using degenerate polymerase chain reaction, we have identified a new murine TGF-beta family member,(More)
Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-beta family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To identify possible myostatin inhibitors that may have applications for promoting muscle growth, we investigated the regulation of myostatin signaling. Myostatin protein purified from mammalian cells consisted of a noncovalently held(More)
The bones that comprise the axial skeleton have distinct morphological features characteristic of their positions along the anterior/posterior axis. We previously described a novel TGF-beta family member, myostatin (encoded by the gene Mstn, formerly Gdf8), that has an essential role in regulating skeletal muscle mass. We also identified a gene related to(More)
The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily encompasses a large group of structurally related polypeptides that are capable of regulating cell growth and differentiation in a wide range of embryonic and adult tissues. Growth/differentiation factor-1 (Gdf-1, encoded by Gdf1) is a TGF-beta family member of unknown function that was originally(More)
Myostatin is a secreted protein that normally functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Agents capable of blocking the myostatin signaling pathway could have important applications for treating human muscle degenerative diseases as well as for enhancing livestock production. Here we describe a potent myostatin inhibitor, a soluble form of the(More)
Myostatin and activin A are structurally related secreted proteins that act to limit skeletal muscle growth. The cellular targets for myostatin and activin A in muscle and the role of satellite cells in mediating muscle hypertrophy induced by inhibition of this signaling pathway have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that myostatin/activin A(More)
Myostatin is a transforming growth factor beta family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Myostatin circulates in the blood of adult mice in a noncovalently held complex with other proteins, including its propeptide, which maintain the C-terminal dimer in a latent, inactive state. This latent form of myostatin can be(More)
From the Departments of Neuropediatrics (M.S., C.H.), Pediatric Radiology (T.R.), and Neonatology (W.K.), Charité, University Medical Center Berlin, Berlin; the Departments of Neurology (K.R.W.) and Molecular Biology and Genetics (S.-J.L.), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore; the Department of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Wyeth(More)
Mice and cattle with genetic deficiencies in myostatin exhibit dramatic increases in skeletal muscle mass, suggesting that myostatin normally suppresses muscle growth. Whether this increased muscling results from prenatal or postnatal lack of myostatin activity is unknown. Here we show that myostatin circulates in the blood of adult mice in a latent form(More)
  • Se-Jin Lee
  • 2004
Myostatin is a secreted protein that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. During embryogenesis, myostatin is expressed by cells in the myotome and in developing skeletal muscle and acts to regulate the final number of muscle fibers that are formed. During adult life, myostatin protein is produced by skeletal muscle, circulates in the blood,(More)