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Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection is a serious infection with significant patient mortality and health-care costs. Nevertheless, the relationship between initial appropriate antimicrobial treatment and clinical outcomes is not well established. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis employing automated patient medical records and the(More)
Pneumonia occurring outside of the hospital setting has traditionally been categorized as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, when pneumonia is associated with health care risk factors (prior hospitalization, dialysis, residing in a nursing home, immunocompromised state), it is now more appropriately classified as a health care-associated pneumonia(More)
BACKGROUND Pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa now cause pneumonia in patients presenting to the hospital. The concept of health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) attempts to capture this, but its predictive value is unclear. METHODS We examined patients admitted with pneumonia; infection with a(More)
BACKGROUND Recent studies have suggested that early goal-directed resuscitation of patients with septic shock and conservative fluid management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) can improve outcomes. Because these may be seen as potentially conflicting practices, we set out to determine the influence of fluid management on the outcomes of patients(More)
Vancomycin remains the reference standard for the treatment of systemic infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, as a result of limited tissue distribution, as well as the emergence of isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin, the need for alternative therapies that target MRSA has(More)
BACKGROUND Candida represents the most common cause of invasive fungal disease, and candidal blood stream infections (CBSI) are prevalent in the ICU. Inappropriate antifungal therapy (IAT) is known to increase a patient's risk for death. We hypothesized that in an ICU cohort it would also adversely affect resource utilization. METHODS We retrospectively(More)
The optimal approach for empirical antibiotic therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock remains controversial. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the intensive care units of a university hospital. The data from 760 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock associated with Gram-negative bacteremia was analyzed. Among this cohort,(More)
OBJECTIVE To compare heparin (3 mL, 10 units/mL) and 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl, 10 mL) flush solutions with respect to central venous catheter lumen patency. DESIGN Single-center, randomized, open label trial. SETTING Medical intensive care unit and Surgical/Burn/Trauma intensive care unit at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO. PATIENTS Three(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess the timing of appropriate antibiotic therapy as a determinant of postinfection hospital and ICU lengths of stay in patients with sepsis. DESIGN Single-center retrospective cohort study (January 2008-December 2012). SETTING One thousand two hundred fifty-bed academic hospital. PATIENTS One thousand fifty-eight consecutive blood(More)
OBJECTIVES Classically, infections have been considered either nosocomial or community-acquired. Healthcare-associated infection represents a new classification intended to capture patients who have infection onset outside the hospital, but who, nonetheless, have interactions with the healthcare system. Regarding bloodstream infection (BSI), little data(More)