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Helicobacter pylori, strain 26695, has a circular genome of 1,667,867 base pairs and 1,590 predicted coding sequences. Sequence analysis indicates that H. pylori has well-developed systems for motility, for scavenging iron, and for DNA restriction and modification. Many putative adhesins, lipoproteins and other outer membrane proteins were identified,(More)
The complete nucleotide sequence (580,070 base pairs) of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome, the smallest known genome of any free-living organism, has been determined by whole-genome random sequencing and assembly. A total of only 470 predicted coding regions were identified that include genes required for DNA replication, transcription and translation, DNA(More)
Archaeoglobus fulgidus is the first sulphur-metabolizing organism to have its genome sequence determined. Its genome of 2,178,400 base pairs contains 2,436 open reading frames (ORFs). The information processing systems and the biosynthetic pathways for essential components (nucleotides, amino acids and cofactors) have extensive correlation with their(More)
The 2,160,837-base pair genome sequence of an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and otitis media, contains 2236 predicted coding regions; of these, 1440 (64%) were assigned a biological role. Approximately 5% of the genome is composed of insertion sequences that may contribute to(More)
During the first hour after a sublethal dose of ionizing radiation, 72 genes were upregulated threefold or higher in D. radiodurans R1. Thirty-three of these loci were also among a set of 73 genes expressed in R1 cultures recovering from desiccation. The five transcripts most highly induced in response to each stress are the same and encode proteins of(More)
Natural genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae is controlled in part by a quorum-sensing system mediated by a peptide pheromone called competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), which acts to coordinate transient activation of genes required for competence. To characterize the transcriptional response and regulatory events occurring when cells are(More)
Mycoplasma genitalium with 517 genes has the smallest gene complement of any independently replicating cell so far identified. Global transposon mutagenesis was used to identify nonessential genes in an effort to learn whether the naturally occurring gene complement is a true minimal genome under laboratory growth conditions. The positions of 2209(More)
The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the other completely sequenced genomes identified genes specific(More)
Competence for genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae is coordinated by the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), which induces a sudden and transient appearance of competence during exponential growth in vitro. Models of this quorum-sensing mechanism have proposed sequential expression of several regulatory genes followed by induction of target(More)
Yersinia pestis cells were grown in vitro at 26 and 37 degrees C, the ambient temperatures of its flea vector and its mammalian hosts, respectively, and subjected to subcellular fractionation. Abundance changes at 26 vs 37 degrees C were observed for many outer-membrane (OM) proteins. The cell adhesion protein Ail (y1324) and three putative small(More)