Scott M. Filippone

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Diabetic patients suffer augmented severity of myocardial infarction. Excessive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and decreased activation of STAT3 are implicated in diabetic complications. Considering the potent cardioprotective effect of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, we hypothesized that reperfusion therapy with rapamycin would reduce(More)
Doxorubicin (DOX, Adriamycin) is a broad-spectrum chemotherapeutic drug used to treat a variety of cancers, although its clinical use is restricted by irreversible cardiotoxicity. Earlier studies show that beet root juice (BRJ), a natural and safe herbal product with high levels of nitrate and antioxidants, is a potent chemopreventive agent; however, its(More)
Prompt coronary reperfusion is the gold standard for minimizing injury following acute myocardial infarction. Rapamycin, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, exerts preconditioning-like cardioprotective effects against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We hypothesized that Rapamycin, given at the onset of reperfusion, reduces myocardial infarct(More)
Aims The preconditioning-like infarct-sparing and anti-inflammatory effects of the peptide hormone relaxin following ischemic injury have been studied in the heart. Whether reperfusion therapy with recombinant human relaxin-2, serelaxin, reduces myocardial infarct size and attenuates the subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation leading to further loss of(More)
The chemotherapeutic use of doxorubicin (Dox) is hindered due to the development of irreversible cardiotoxicity. Specifically, childhood cancer survivors are at greater risk of Dox-induced cardiovascular complications. Because of the potent cardioprotective effect of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, we examined the effect of long-acting PDE5 inhibitor(More)
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