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Accurate localization of brain activity recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) requires that the forward problem, i.e. the magnetic field caused by a dipolar source current in a homogeneous volume conductor, be solved precisely. We have used the Galerkin method with piecewise linear basis functions in the boundary element method to improve the solution of(More)
Sources of brain activity, e.g. epileptic foci, can be localized with Magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements by recording the magnetic field outside the head. For a successful surgery a very high localization accuracy is needed. The most often used conductor model in the source localization is an analytic sphere, which is not always adequate, and thus a(More)
We study the iterative solution of dense linear systems that arise from boundary element discretizations of the electrostatic integral equation in magnetoencephalography (MEG). We show that modern iterative methods can be used to decrease the total computation time by avoiding the time-consuming computation of the LU decomposition of the coefficient matrix.(More)
Sources of brain activity, e.g., epileptic foci can be localized by measuring the magnetic eld outside the head (MEG) or by recording the electric potential on the scalp (EEG). For a successful surgery a very high localization accuracy is needed. The most often used conductor model in the source localization is an analytic sphere, which is not always(More)
Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive technique for studying neuronal activity in the living human brain. Weak magnetic elds caused by the activity are measured from outside the head. Based on these measurements the source of the activity is located with the help of a mathematical model. A part of the localization is the repeated computation of the(More)
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