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Fecal incontinence occurs when the normal anatomy or physiology that maintains the structure and function of the anorectal unit is disrupted. Incontinence usually results from the interplay of multiple pathogenic mechanisms and is rarely attributable to a single factor. The internal anal sphincter (IAS) provides most of the resting anal pressure and is(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS Colonic transit time (CTT) traditionally is assessed with radiopaque markers (ROMs), which requires radiation and is hindered by lack of standardization and compliance. We assessed regional and CTT with the SmartPill (SmartPill Corporation, Buffalo, NY), a new wireless pH and pressure recording capsule, in constipated and healthy subjects(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS Constipation is a common disorder, and current treatments are generally unsatisfactory. Biofeedback might help patients with constipation and dyssynergic defecation, but its efficacy is unproven, and whether improvements are due to operant conditioning or personal attention is unknown. METHODS In a prospective randomized trial, we(More)
In August 2013, the National Institutes of Health sponsored a conference to address major gaps in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of fecal incontinence (FI) and to identify topics for future clinical research. This article is the first of a two-part summary of those proceedings. FI is a common symptom, with a(More)
BACKGROUND The colonic neuromuscular dysfunction in patients with constipation and the role of colonic manometry is incompletely understood. AIM To study prolonged colonic motility and assess its clinical significance. METHODS Twenty-four-hour ambulatory colonic manometry was performed in 21 patients with slow-transit constipation and 20 healthy(More)
This article focuses on the colonic and anorectal motility disturbances that are associated with chronic constipation and their management. Functional chronic constipation consists of three overlapping subtypes: slow transit constipation, dyssynergic defecation, and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation. The Rome criteria may serve as a useful guide(More)
BACKGROUND Disorders of gastrointestinal (GI) transit and motility are common, and cause either delayed or accelerated transit through the stomach, small intestine or colon, and affect one or more regions. Assessment of regional and/or whole gut transit times can provide direct measurements and diagnostic information to explain the cause of symptoms, and(More)
OBJECTIVES About 35% of humans have methane-producing gut flora. Methane-producing irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subjects are generally constipated. In animal models, methane infusion slows intestinal transit. Whether methanogenic flora alters colonic transit or stool characteristics and its relationship to constipation is unclear. The aim of this study(More)
In this report the functional anorectal disorders, the etiology of which is currently unknown or related to the abnormal functioning of normally innervated and structurally intact muscles, are discussed. These disorders include functional fecal incontinence, functional anorectal pain, including levator ani syndrome and proctalgia fugax, and pelvic floor(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS Few treatments have demonstrated efficacy and safety for diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). A phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment with the nonsystemic antibiotic rifaximin. METHODS The trial included adults with IBS-D, mean(More)