Saskia A. M. J. Lesnik Oberstein

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BACKGROUND Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary arteriopathy leading to recurrent cerebral infarcts and dementia. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been described sporadically in patients with CADASIL, suggesting that the affected arteries in CADASIL are not bleed-prone.(More)
Peters Plus syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by anterior eye-chamber abnormalities, disproportionate short stature, and developmental delay. After detection of a microdeletion by array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we identified biallelic truncating mutations in the beta 1,3-galactosyltransferase-like gene (B3GALTL) in(More)
BACKGROUND Cognitive decline is one of the clinical hallmarks of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a cerebrovascular disease caused by NOTCH3 mutations. In this 7-year follow-up study, we aimed to determine whether there are associations between the different radiologic hallmarks in CADASIL(More)
OBJECTIVE Diffuse iron deposition in the brain is commonly found in older people. One of the possible mechanisms that contribute to this iron deposition is cerebral small vessel disease. The aim of this study is to quantify diffuse iron deposition in patients with the hereditary small vessel disease cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical(More)
PURPOSE To prospectively investigate the patterns and rates of progression of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging abnormalities in a well-documented cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) cohort 7 years after baseline and to identify the prognostic factors that determine the rates and patterns of(More)
CADASIL is an autosomal dominant inherited disease, characterized by mid-adult onset of cerebrovascular disease and dementia. CADASIL is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, which encodes the NOTCH3 protein. Pathogenic mutations in CADASIL are highly distinctive in the sense that they lead to the loss or gain of a cysteine residue in 1 of the 34 EGFr(More)
Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis - Dutch type is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease caused by a point mutation in the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21. The mutation causes an amino acid substitution at codon 693 (E22Q), the 'Dutch mutation'. Amyloid β, the product after cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is(More)
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene and is clinically characterized by recurrent stroke and cognitive decline. Previous studies have shown an association between white matter hyperintensities on brain MRI and cognitive dysfunction in(More)
Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an angiopathy caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. Typical microvascular changes are found throughout the arterial tree, but the documented disease expression is confined to the central nervous system. In an ongoing CADASIL study, we noted a number of(More)
PURPOSE To depict various brain lesions that have been described in patients who have cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) with prospective standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients of different age groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty patients with CADASIL in different age(More)