• Publications
  • Influence
Multiple defensive roles for triterpene glycosides from two Caribbean sponges
TLDR
The dual strategy of employing one group of compounds for multiple purposes and minimizing the loss of compounds into seawater suggests that these organisms utilize chemical defenses with efficiency. Expand
Effects of Caribbean Sponge Extracts on Bacterial Attachment
TLDR
Bacterial attachment was tested using Vibrio harveyi, a motile marine bacterium isolated from seawater collected above one of the reefs from which sponges were sampled, providing evidence that sponge secondary metabolites may have multiple ecological functions. Expand
Halovirs A-E, new antiviral agents from a marine-derived fungus of the genus Scytalidium.
TLDR
Evidence is presented that the halovirs directly inactivate herpes viruses, a mechanism of action that could be applicable in the prevention of HSV transmission. Expand
Effects of Caribbean sponge secondary metabolites on bacterial surface colonization
TLDR
Non-toxic metabolites may play the greatest role in affecting bacterial epibiosis on the surfaces of marine sponges, and to a lesser degree influence swarming and growth. Expand
Development and validation of a quantitative PCR assay for the early detection and monitoring of the invasive diatom Didymosphenia geminata
TLDR
A TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assay for sensitive and rapid detection and enumeration of D. geminata in environmental samples is developed andylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequences suggests that D. Geminata is more closely related to species in the family Cymbellaceae rather than Gomphonemataceae as currently classified. Expand
Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of the halovirs, antiviral natural products from a marine-derived fungus.
TLDR
Results demonstrate that an N(alpha)-acyl chain of at least 14 carbons and an Aib-Pro dipeptide are critical for maintaining the antiviral activity. Expand
The Origin, Genetic Diversity and Taxonomy of the Invasive Diatom Didymosphenia geminata (Bacilliariophyceae) in New Zealand
TLDR
Results from this investigation indicate that D. geminata may belong to the Family Cymbellaceae, and can be used to inform strategies regarding the control and management of this invasive species, including lending support for continuation of the Biosecurity New Zealand program. Expand