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Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has recently been investigated as a non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI). In particular, previous research has shown that NIRS signals recorded from the motor cortex during left- and right-hand imagery can be distinguished, providing a basis for a two-choice NIRS-BCI. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of(More)
This paper reported initial findings on the effects of environmental noise and auditory distractions on the performance of mental state classification based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signals recorded from the prefrontal cortex. Characterization of the performance losses due to environmental factors could provide useful information for the future(More)
Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has recently been investigated as a non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) for individuals with severe motor impairments. For the most part, previous research has investigated the development of NIRS-BCIs operating under synchronous control paradigms, which require the user to exert conscious control over their mental(More)
Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been recently investigated for use in noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability to classify patterns of neural activation associated with different mental tasks (e.g., mental arithmetic) using NIRS signals. Though these studies represent an important step(More)
OBJECTIVE Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical imaging technique that has recently been considered for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. To date, NIRS-BCI studies have primarily made use of temporal features of brain activity, derived from the time-course of optical signals measured from discrete locations, to differentiate mental(More)
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow users to control external devices via brain activity alone, circumventing the somatic nervous system and the need for overt movement. Essential to BCI development is the ability to accurately detect and classify patterns of activation associated with different mental tasks. Here, we investigate the ability to(More)
Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical imaging technology that has recently been investigated for use in a safe, non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) for individuals with severe motor impairments. To date, most NIRS-BCI studies have attempted to discriminate two mental states (e.g., a mental task and rest), which could potentially lead to a(More)
Communication barriers often result in exclusion of children and youth with disabilities from activities and social settings that are essential to their psychosocial development. In particular, difficulties in describing their experiences of activities and social settings hinder our understanding of the factors that promote inclusion and participation of(More)
Infrared thermal imaging of the inner canthi of the periorbital regions of the face can potentially serve as an input signal modality for an alternative access system for individuals with conditions that preclude speech or voluntary movement, such as total locked-in syndrome. However, it is unknown if the temperature of these regions is affected by the(More)
BACKGROUND Electrodermal reactions (EDRs) can be attributed to many origins, including spontaneous fluctuations of electrodermal activity (EDA) and stimuli such as deep inspirations, voluntary mental activity and startling events. In fields that use EDA as a measure of psychophysiological state, the fact that EDRs may be elicited from many different stimuli(More)