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How Birds Combat Ectoparasites
TLDR
The evidence - or lack thereof - for many of the purported mechanisms birds have for dealing with ectoparasites are reviewed, focusing on features of the plumage and its components, as well as anti-parasite behaviors. Expand
Ecology of congruence: past meets present.
TLDR
Careful comparison of chewing lice genera suggests that dispersal is a more fundamental barrier to host switching among related hosts than is establishment, and there is a correspondence between important ecological factors and the degree of phylogenetic congruence. Expand
Host defense reinforces host–parasite cospeciation
TLDR
Host defense reinforces cospeciation in birds and feather lice by preventing lice from switching between hosts of different sizes, suggesting that adaptive constraints limit the range of hosts lice can use. Expand
Host defence mediates interspecific competition in ectoparasites.
TLDR
The results indicate that host-defence-mediated competition can influence the structure of parasite communities and may play a part in the evolution of parasite diversity. Expand
COMPARATIVE TRANSMISSION DYNAMICS OF COMPETING PARASITE SPECIES.
TLDR
The dispersal prediction of the competition-colonization model was tested by documenting the transmission dynamics of feather-feeding lice, which are permanent, relatively host-specific parasites of birds, and it was confirmed that wing lice are much better than body lice at colonizing new hosts. Expand
Adaptive significance of avian beak morphology for ectoparasite control
TLDR
A feature of the beak specifically adapted for ectoparasite control is shown, significantly enhancing the efficiency of preening for parasite control in rock pigeons. Expand
Influenza A Virus Infections in Land Birds, People’s Republic of China
TLDR
Water birds are considered the reservoir for avian influenza viruses, and sampling and real-time reverse transcription–PCR testing of 939 Asian land birds of 153 species found Influenza A infection, particularly among migratory species. Expand
Morphological revision of the hyperdiverse Brueelia -complex (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) with new taxa, checklists and generic key
TLDR
The genus Brueelia Keler, 1936a forms the core of the so-called “Brueelia -complex”, one of the largest and most heterogeneous groups of lice (Phthiraptera) and a revision of this group is presented. Expand
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