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RATIONALE, AIM AND OBJECTIVE In 2009, the UK Department of Health formalized recommended National Health Service practices for the management of tinnitus from primary care onwards. It is timely therefore to evaluate the perceived practicality, utility and impact of those guidelines in the context of current practice. METHODS We surveyed current practice(More)
BACKGROUND Previous studies of frequency discrimination training (FDT) for tinnitus used repetitive task-based training programmes relying on extrinsic factors to motivate participation. Studies reported limited improvement in tinnitus symptoms. PURPOSE To evaluate FDT exploiting intrinsic motivations by integrating training with computer-gameplay. (More)
BACKGROUND In the UK, audiology services deliver the majority of tinnitus patient care, but not all patients experience the same level of service. In 2009, the Department of Health released a Good Practice Guide to inform commissioners about key aspects of a quality tinnitus service in order to promote equity of tinnitus patient care in UK primary care,(More)
BACKGROUND Tinnitus is a prevalent and complex medical complaint often co-morbid with stress, anxiety, insomnia, depression, and cognitive or communication difficulties. Its chronicity places a major burden on primary and secondary healthcare services. In our recent national survey of General Practitioners (GPs) from across England, many reported that their(More)
OBJECTIVES In many countries including the United Kingdom, hearing aids are a first line of audiologic intervention for many people with tinnitus and aidable hearing loss. Nevertheless, there is a lack of high quality evidence to support that they are of benefit for tinnitus, and wide variability in their use in clinical practice especially for people with(More)
RATIONALE, AIM AND OBJECTIVE Effective tinnitus management starts with appropriate general practitioner (GP) triage, which in England can be guided by the Department of Health's Good Practice Guide (GPG). Despite the prevalence of the condition, there has never been a systematic survey of its management in primary care in England. We aimed to evaluate how(More)
Unintended medication discrepancies at hospital admission and discharge potentially harm patients. Explicit medication reconciliation (MR) can prevent unintended discrepancies among care settings and is mandated by JCAHO for 2005. Enterprise-wide, we are linking pre-admission and discharge medication lists in our outpatient electronic health records (EHR)(More)