Samia Souissi

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We study the problem of Byzantine agreement in synchronous systems where malicious agents can move from one process to another and try to corrupt them. This model is known as mobile Byzantine faults. In a previous result [10], Garay has shown that n > 6t (n is the total number of processes, and t is the number of mobile faults) is sufficient to solve this(More)
In this paper, we consider problems of coordinating and controlling the motion of a group of autonomous mobile robots engaged on common tasks. In particular, we present simulation results of a distributed algorithm for converging autonomous mobile robots toward the formation of a uniform circle. The algorithm takes a configuration wherein robots, already(More)
Reaching agreement among a set of mobile robots is one of the most fundamental issues in distributed robotic systems. This problem is often illustrated by the gathering problem, where the robots must self-organize and meet at some location not determined in advance, and without the help of some global coordinate system. While very simple to express, this(More)
This paper considers a system of asynchronous autonomous mobile robots that can move freely in a two­ dimensional plane with no agreement on a common coordinate system. Startingfrom any initial configuration, the robots are required to eventually gather at a single point, notfixed in advance (gathering problem). Prior work has shown that gathering oblivious(More)
Consider a system composed of mobile robots (mobile sensors) that move on the plane, each of which independently executing its own instance of an algorithm. Given a desired geometric pattern, the flocking problem consists in ensuring that the robots form this pattern and maintain it while moving together on the plane. In this paper, we look at the flocking(More)
Continuous advances in technology have made possible the use of several robots in order to carry out a large variety of cooperative tasks that are dangerous or undesirable for humans to complete. Nevertheless, merely bringing robots together is by no means sufficient, and adequate coordination mechanisms must be designed to ensure coherent group behavior.(More)
Anonymous mobile robots are often classified into synchronous, semi-synchronous and asynchronous robots when discussing the pattern formation problem. For semi-synchronous robots, all patterns formable with memory are also formable without memory, with the single exception of forming a point (i.e., the gathering) by two robots. (All patterns formable with(More)
Reaching agreement among a set of mobile robots is one of the most fundamental issues in distributed robotic systems. This problem is often illustrated by the gathering problem, where the robots must self-organize to eventually meet at some arbitrary location. That problem has the advantage that, while being very simple to express, it retains the inherent(More)