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The neuropathological correlates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include amyloid-beta (Abeta) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. To study the interaction between Abeta and tau and their effect on synaptic function, we derived a triple-transgenic model (3xTg-AD) harboring PS1(M146V), APP(Swe), and tau(P301L) transgenes. Rather than crossing independent lines,(More)
Amyloid-beta (Abeta) containing plaques and tau-laden neurofibrillary tangles are the defining neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better mimic this neuropathology, we generated a novel triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD) harboring three mutant genes: beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPPSwe), presenilin-1 (PS1M146V), and(More)
Neuronal Ca2+ signaling through inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) must be tightly regulated to maintain cell viability, both acutely and over a lifetime. Exaggerated intracellular Ca2+ levels have been associated with expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) mutations in young mice, but little is known of Ca2+(More)
Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are composed of abnormal aggregates of the cytoskeletal protein tau. Together with amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques and neuronal and synaptic loss, NFTs constitute the primary pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent evidence also suggests that caspases are activated early in the progression of AD and may play a(More)
Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) and Tau is an invariant feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). The upstream role of Abeta accumulation in the disease pathogenesis is widely accepted, and there is strong evidence showing that Abeta accumulation causes cognitive impairments. However, the molecular mechanisms linking Abeta to cognitive decline remain to be(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia among the elderly and is a complex disorder that involves altered proteolysis, oxidative stress and disruption of ion homeostasis. Animal models have proven useful in studying the impact of mutant AD-related genes on other cellular signaling pathways, such as Ca2+ signaling. Along these lines,(More)
The primal role that the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide has in the development of Alzheimer's disease is now almost universally accepted. It is also well recognized that Abeta exists in multiple assembly states, which have different physiological or pathophysiological effects. Although the classical view is that Abeta is deposited extracellularly, emerging(More)
Amyloid-beta (Abeta) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are the hallmark neuropathological lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a triple transgenic model (3xTg-AD) that develops both lesions in AD-relevant brain regions, we determined the consequence of Abeta clearance on the development of tau pathology. Here we show that Abeta immunotherapy reduces(More)
Previous studies have shown that inducing autophagy ameliorates early cognitive deficits associated with the build-up of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ). However, the effects of inducing autophagy on plaques and tangles are yet to be determined. While soluble Aβ and tau represent toxic species in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, there is well documented(More)
It has become generally accepted that new neurones are added and integrated mainly in two areas of the mammalian CNS, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which is of central importance in learning and memory. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, are able to generate action(More)