Sabine C. L. van Steenbergen

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Autologous T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antibody receptor (CAR) against carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) were administered to 12 patients with CAIX-expressing metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 infusions of a total of 0.2 to 2.1 × 10(9) CAR T cells. CTC grade 2-4 liver enzyme(More)
Adoptive therapy with TCR gene-engineered T cells provides an attractive and feasible treatment option for cancer patients. Further development of TCR gene therapy requires the implementation of T-cell target epitopes that prevent "on-target" reactivity towards healthy tissues and at the same time direct a clinically effective response towards tumor(More)
BACKGROUND For our clinical immunogene therapy study for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients, we had developed a protocol for gene transduction and expansion of human T cells in compliance with good manufacturing practice (GMP) criteria. Critical to our successful clinical-scale transductions of patient T cells was the use of Retronectin in(More)
BACKGROUND AIMS The generation of gene-modified T cells for clinical adoptive T-cell therapy is challenged by the potential instability and concomitant high financial costs of critical T-cell activation and transduction components. As part of a clinical trial to treat patients with metastatic renal cell cancer with autologous T cells engineered with a(More)
Autologous T cells were genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed toward carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) and used to treat patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In this study, we questioned whether the T cell maturation stage in the pre-infusion product affected CAIX CAR expression and function in vitro as(More)
Autologous T-cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) against carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) were administered to twelve patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Here, we questioned whether plasma cytokine levels following treatment or in vitro cytokine production from the T-cell infusion products could serve(More)
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