SAMUEL SOKOL

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The latency of the first (P1) and second (P2) major positive waves of the pattern reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) for small checks (15 minutes of arc) was measured in 68 visually normal children and 32 amblyopic children with mild to moderate visual acuity losses. In the normal children there were no P1 and P2 interocular latency differences. The(More)
The purpose of this chapter has been to demonstrate that the VEP can be used as an objective measure of visual function in infants and young children. It provides the clinician with a quantifiable index of visual impairment, and indeed may be useful in predicting a reduction of subjective visual acuity before it is found on clinical examination. There is no(More)
Visually evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded from infants two to six months of age using a checkerboard pattern reversal stimulus. By six months, infants produced the largest amplitude VEP to checks subtending visual angles of 7.5 or 15 minutes of arc, as do adults with 20/20 acuity. This finding indicates that by six months an infant's sensory capacity(More)
Recurrent stroke is a major public health concern and new treatment strategies are needed. While modulation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) has proven effective in reducing recurrent cardiac events, its role in preventing recurrent cerebrovascular events remains unclear. RAAS is both a circulating and tissue based hormonal system that(More)
Optic nerve dysfunction occurred several weeks after traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula developed in a 21-year-old man. Vision was completely restored after the fistula was closed with an intra-arterial detachable balloon. By carefully monitoring visual function in patients with traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas, delayed optic neuropathy can be(More)
SUMMARY The latency of the first (PI) and second (P2) major positive waves of the pattern reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) for small checks (15 minutes of arc) was measured in 68 visually normal children and 32 amblyopic children with mild to moderate visual acuity losses. In the normal children there were no P1 and P2 interocular latency differences.(More)
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