• Publications
  • Influence
Risk perceptions of COVID-19 around the world
TLDR
It is found that although levels of concern are relatively high, they are highest in the UK compared to all other sampled countries, and risk perception correlated significantly with reported adoption of preventative health behaviors in all ten countries.
The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change as a Gateway Belief: Experimental Evidence
TLDR
It is found that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change.
Susceptibility to misinformation about COVID-19 around the world
TLDR
A clear link between susceptibility to misinformation and both vaccine hesitancy and a reduced likelihood to comply with health guidance measures is demonstrated, and interventions which aim to improve critical thinking and trust in science may be a promising avenue for future research.
Improving Public Engagement With Climate Change
TLDR
It is argued that policymakers should emphasize climate change as a present, local, and personal risk; facilitate more affective and experiential engagement; leverage relevant social group norms; and frame policy solutions in terms of what can be gained from immediate action.
Communicating uncertainty about facts, numbers and science
TLDR
This interdisciplinary review structures and summarizes current practice and research across domains, combining a statistical and psychological perspective, and develops a framework for uncertainty communication in which three objects of uncertainty—facts, numbers and science—and two levels of uncertainty: direct and indirect are identified.
Inoculating the Public against Misinformation about Climate Change
TLDR
The current research bridges the divide by exploring how people evaluate and process consensus cues in a polarized information environment and evidence is provided that it is possible to pre‐emptively protect public attitudes about climate change against real‐world misinformation.
On the relationship between personal experience, affect and risk perception: The case of climate change
TLDR
Investigation of the interrelated nature of personal experience, affect, and risk perception by contrasting three prominent social-psychological theories concludes that both theoretical claims are valid and that a dual-process perspective provides a superior fit to the data.
Highlighting consensus among medical scientists increases public support for vaccines: evidence from a randomized experiment
TLDR
Mediation analysis revealed that the public’s understanding of the level of scientific agreement acts as an important “gateway” belief by promoting public attitudes and policy support for vaccines directly as well as indirectly by reducing endorsement of the discredited autism-vaccine link.
Communicating the Scientific Consensus on Human-Caused Climate Change is an Effective and Depolarizing Public Engagement Strategy: Experimental Evidence from a Large National Replication Study
This experimental study evaluated whether communicating the scientific consensus on human-caused climate change is likely to be effective with the American public. Drawing on a large national sample
The fake news game: actively inoculating against the risk of misinformation
Abstract The rapid spread of online misinformation poses an increasing risk to societies worldwide. To help counter this, we developed a ‘fake news game’ in which participants are actively tasked
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