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The Renaissance of Security Studies
  • S. Walt
  • Political Science
  • 1 June 1991
This article examines the evolution of security studies, focusing on recent developments in the field. It provides a survey of the field, a guide to the current research agenda, and some practical
International Relations: One World, Many Theories
Why should policymakers and practitioners care about the scholarly study of international affairs? Those who conduct foreign policy often dismiss academic theorists (frequently, one must admit, with
The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy
In this paper, John J. Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago's Department of Political Science and Stephen M.Walt of Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government contend that the centerpiece
Alliance Formation and the Balance of World Power
  • S. Walt
  • Political Science
  • 21 January 1985
The question "what causes alignment?" is a central issue in debates on American foreign policy, and the choices that are made often turn on which hypotheses of alliance formation are endorsed. In
Why alliances endure or collapse
  • S. Walt
  • Political Science
  • 1 March 1997
Revolution and War
Revolutions are watershed events in international politics, yet the existing literature on revolutions focuses primarily on the causes of revolution or its effects on domestic politics. Revolutions
Leaving theory behind: Why simplistic hypothesis testing is bad for International Relations
Theory creating and hypothesis testing are both critical components of social science, but the former is ultimately more important. Yet, in recent years, International Relations scholars have devoted
Alliances in a Unipolar World
  • S. Walt
  • Political Science
  • 27 February 2009
Unipolarity is a novel condition in world politics, and its effects on international alliances have yet to receive sustained theoretical attention. Tracing its impact requires a careful distinction
Taming American Power
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