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Identification of a pathway for intelligible speech in the left temporal lobe.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the left superior temporal sulcus responds to the presence of phonetic information, but its anterior part only responds if the stimulus is also intelligible, demonstrating a left anterior temporal pathway for speech comprehension.
Amplitude envelope onsets and developmental dyslexia: A new hypothesis
TLDR
This work argues that a likely perceptual cause of developmental dyslexia is a deficit in the perceptual experience of rhythmic timing, and shows significant differences between dyslexic and normally reading children, and between young early readers and normal developers, in amplitude envelope onset detection.
Defining a left-lateralized response specific to intelligible speech using fMRI.
TLDR
The results demonstrate that there are neural responses to intelligible speech along the length of the left lateral temporal neocortex, although the precise processing roles of the anterior and posterior regions cannot be determined from this study.
Adaptation by normal listeners to upward spectral shifts of speech: implications for cochlear implants.
TLDR
After just nine 20-min sessions of connected discourse tracking with the shifted simulation, performance improved significantly for the identification of intervocalic consonants, medial vowels in monosyllables, and words in sentences; listeners were able to track connected discourse of shifted signals without lipreading at rates up to 40 words per minute.
Listening to speech in a background of other talkers: effects of talker number and noise vocoding.
TLDR
Recognition for natural Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) sentences was measured in normal-hearing adults at two fixed signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in 16 backgrounds with the same long-term spectrum, and natural speech was always the most effective masker for a given number of talkers.
The role of auditory and cognitive factors in understanding speech in noise by normal-hearing older listeners
TLDR
Despite declines in cognitive processing, normal-hearing older adults do not necessarily have problems understanding speech in noise as SRTs in SS and AM noise did not differ significantly between the two groups and this could not be explained by age-related cognitive declines in working memory or processing speed.
A positron emission tomography study of the neural basis of informational and energetic masking effects in speech perception.
TLDR
This study is a novel demonstration of candidate neural systems involved in the perception of speech in noisy environments, and of the processing of multiple speakers in the dorso-lateral temporal lobes.
Musicians and non-musicians are equally adept at perceiving masked speech.
TLDR
Although musicians outperformed non-musicians on a measure of frequency discrimination, they showed no advantage in perceiving masked speech, and non-verbal IQ, rather than musicianship, significantly predicted speech reception thresholds in noise.
Evolving concepts of developmental auditory processing disorder (APD): A British Society of Audiology APD Special Interest Group ‘white paper’
TLDR
Screening for APD may be most appropriately based on a well-validated, caregiver questionnaire that captures the fundamental problem of listening difficulties and identifies areas for further assessment and management, and may in future serve as a metric to help assess other, objective testing methods.
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