• Publications
  • Influence
Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome
Human genomes are 99.9 percent identical - with one prominent exception. Instead of a matching pair of X chromosomes, men carry a single X, coupled with a tiny chromosome called the Y. Tracking theExpand
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Maternal Bodies in the Postgenomic Order: Gender and the Explanatory Landscape of Epigenetics
The neurologist and ge ne ticist Michael Meaney argues that a stressed pregnant woman may produce o! spring prone to anxiety, depression, schizophre nia, and suicide.1 The psychiatrist Ray BlanchardExpand
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Revisiting race in a genomic age
With the completion of the sequencing of the human genome in 2001, the debate over the existence of a biological basis for race has been revived. In ""Revisiting Race in a Genomic Age"",Expand
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Society: Don't blame the mothers
Careless discussion of epigenetic research on how early life affects health across generations could harm women, warn Sarah S. Richardson and colleagues.
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Opinion: Focus on preclinical sex differences will not address women’s and men’s health disparities
Last spring, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced a new policy calling for the use of both male and female materials—animals, tissues, cells, and cell lines—in preclinical researchExpand
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Postgenomics : perspectives on biology after the genome
Foreward. Biology's Love Affair with the Genome / Russ Altman vii 1. Beyond the Genome / Hallam Stevens and Sarah S. Richardson 1 2. The Postgenomic Genome / Evelyn Fox Keller 9 3. What Toll Pursuit:Expand
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Sex in Context: Limitations of Animal Studies for Addressing Human Sex/Gender Neurobehavioral Health Disparities
Many brain and behavioral disorders differentially affect men and women. The new National Institutes of Health requirement to include both male and female animals in preclinical studies aims toExpand
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Sexing the X: How the X Became the “Female Chromosome”
  • S. Richardson
  • Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
  • 1 June 2012
This essay examines how the X became the “female chromosome” and how the association of the X with femaleness influences research questions, models, and descriptive language in human sex chromosomeExpand
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The Left Vienna Circle, Part 1. Carnap, Neurath, and the Left Vienna Circle thesis
Abstract Recent scholarship resuscitates the history and philosophy of a ‘left wing’ in the Vienna Circle, offering a counterhistory to the conventional image of analytic philosophy as politicallyExpand
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The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, disciplinary history, and feminist philosophy of science
Abstract This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model forExpand
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