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Plasticity in life-history traits.
TLDR
The impact of recent life-history plasticity theory on insect studies is described, particularly on the interface between genetics and plasticity, and fitness consequences of variation in size, development time and growth rate are described.
The Effect of Flexible Growth Rates on Optimal Sizes and Development Times in a Seasonal Environment
TLDR
The study focuses on the optimal responses of size, development time, and growth rate to changes in the amount of time available for completion of the life cycle, and shows that the optimal growth rate and size at maturity may respond in several different ways.
Nymphalid butterflies diversify following near demise at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary
TLDR
By dating the branching events, it is inferred that Nymphalidae originated in the Cretaceous at 90 Ma, but that the ancestors of 10–12 lineages survived the end-Cretaceous catastrophe in the Neotropical and Oriental regions.
Adaptive plasticity and plasticity as an adaptation : a selective review of plasticity in animal morphology and life history
TLDR
The terminology and methodology of plasticity studies are discussed, with particular reference to the question of which patterns should be considered evidence for plasticity as an adaptation to the environment, and how to find such evidence.
Intraspecific Variability in Number of Larval Instars in Insects
TLDR
It is shown that intraspecific variability in the number of larval instars is widespread across insect taxa, occurring in most major orders, in both hemimetabolous and holometabolous insects.
Diversity begets diversity: host expansions and the diversification of plant-feeding insects
TLDR
It is concluded that resource diversity is correlated with species richness in the Nymphalidae and suggested a scenario based on recurring oscillations between host expansions – the incorporation of new plants into the repertoire – and specialization, as an important driving force behind the diversification of plant-feeding insects.
Proximate Causes of Rensch’s Rule: Does Sexual Size Dimorphism in Arthropods Result from Sex Differences in Development Time?
TLDR
This study found only a weak positive relationship between SSD and SBM overall, suggesting that growth rate differences between the sexes are more important than development time differences in proximately mediating SSD in a wide but by no means comprehensive range of arthropod taxa.
Synergistic effects of combining morphological and molecular data in resolving the phylogeny of butterflies and skippers
TLDR
This work presents the first well supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the butterflies and skippers based on a total-evidence analysis of both traditional morphological characters and new molecular characters from three gene regions (COI, EF-1α and wingless).
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