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Ticks (Ixodidae) on humans in South America
TLDR
Twenty eight species of Ixodidae have been found on man in South America and ticks of the genus Ixodes do not appear to be major players in transmitting diseases to human. Expand
An overview of systematics and evolution of ticks.
TLDR
The origin of ticks is during the pre-mid Cretaceous period (with both the Argasidae and Ixodidae being established in the middleCretaceous). Expand
Mitochondrial DNA analysis of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Southern Cone of South America.
TLDR
According with the genetic comparative analysis, NT lineage and the ticks from Mozambique and South Africa represent a species that is not R. sanguineus s.l, and further investigations are needed in order to verify a possible different vectorial competence for the other pathogens transmitted by these ticks. Expand
Reassessment of the taxonomic status of Amblyomma cajennense () with the description of three new species, Amblyomma tonelliae n. sp., Amblyomma interandinum n. sp. and Amblyomma patinoi n. sp., and
TLDR
This study provides descriptions and redescriptions, scanning electron microscopic and stereomicroscopic images, updated synonymies, information on geographical distributions, and host associations for each of the 6 species. Expand
The taxonomic status of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806).
TLDR
It is suggested that as a result it is not possible to assign the specific name R. sanguineus s.s. to any population, and further work is required based on the rules issued by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature to clearly define the morphological range of the different populations. Expand
A meta-analysis of host specificity in Neotropical hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae)
TLDR
The conclusion reached in this work indicates that strict host specificity is not common among Neotropical hard ticks and suggests that the influence of tick ecology and evolution of habitat specificity, tick generation time, phenology, time spent off the host and the type of life-cycle could be more important than hosts species. Expand
Infection by Rickettsia bellii and Candidatus “Rickettsia amblyommii” in Amblyomma neumanni Ticks from Argentina
TLDR
The results reinforce previous findings that R. bellii (and probably CandidatusR. amblyommii) are widespread among some Neotropical Amblyomma species, suggesting that these ticks gained these bacterial agents from a common ancestor and/or by recent horizontal transmission of rickettsiae between ticks. Expand
Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787) (Acari: Ixodidae), the Cayenne tick: phylogeography and evidence for allopatric speciation
TLDR
The combined and congruent mitochondrial and nuclear genetic evidence from this study reveals that A. cajennense is an assembly of six distinct species which have evolved separately from each other since at least 13.2 million years ago in the earliest and 3.3 Mya in the latest lineages. Expand
Rickettsia parkeri in Argentina
TLDR
Clinical reports of an eschar-associated rickettsiosis in the Paraná River Delta of Argentina prompted an evaluation of Amblyomma triste ticks in this region, and when evaluated by PCR, 17 (7.6%) of 223 questing adult A. triste tick samples contained DNA of Rickettsia parkeri. Expand
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