• Publications
  • Influence
Psychopathy and Criminal Responsibility
This article considers whether psychopaths should be held criminally responsible. After describing the positive law of criminal responsibility in general and as it applies to psychopaths, it suggestsExpand
Brain Overclaim Syndrome and Criminal Responsibility: A Diagnostic Note
This brief diagnostic note identifies a cognitive pathology, Brain Overclaim Syndrome [BOS], that often afflicts those inflamed by the fascinating new discoveries in the neurosciences. It begins byExpand
The Non-Problem of Free Will in Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology
  • S. Morse
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Behavioral sciences & the law
  • 23 April 2007
This article demonstrates that there is no free will problem in forensic psychiatry by showing that free will or its lack is not a criterion for any legal doctrine and it is not an underlying generalExpand
Medicine and Morals, Craving and Compulsion
  • S. Morse
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Substance use & misuse
  • 1 January 2004
TLDR
It is concluded that most addicts can be held responsible for most addiction-related behavior, and sound public policy should not be based solely on either the medical and moral models. Expand
Reason, Results, and Criminal Responsibility
In this article, Professor Morse provides new insights into the concept of desert in criminal punishment. Professor Morse argues that intentional action and forbearance are the only kinds of humanExpand
Mental Disorder and Criminal Law
Mental disorder among criminal defendants affects every stage of the criminal justice process, from investigational issues to competence to be executed. As in all other areas of mental health law, atExpand
Craziness and criminal responsibility.
  • S. Morse
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Behavioral sciences & the law
  • 1 April 1999
TLDR
Mental disorder rarely negates mens rea, but in those cases in which a plausible claim for negation could be made, defendants should be allowed to make this claim, and the section proposes that mental disorder should produce an excusing condition in appropriate cases. Expand
New neuroscience, old problems: legal implications of brain science.
  • S. Morse
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Cerebrum : the Dana forum on brain science
  • 2004
TLDR
Unless discoveries about the brain radically change the authors' conception of ourselves are unlikely to fundamentally alter legal doctrine, Stephen Morse argues, the law has rich theoretical resources with which to address the findings. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...