• Publications
  • Influence
The Fear-Avoidance Model of Musculoskeletal Pain: Current State of Scientific Evidence
TLDR
The current state of scientific evidence for the individual components of the fear-avoidance model: pain severity, pain catastrophizing, attention to pain, escape/avoidance behavior, disability, disuse, and vulnerabilities is reviewed.
A review of psychological risk factors in back and neck pain.
TLDR
Because the methodologic quality of the studies varied considerably, future research should focus on improving quality and addressing new questions such as the mechanism, the developmental time factor, and the relevance that these risk factors have for intervention.
Early Identification of Patients at Risk of Developing a Persistent Back Problem: The Predictive Validity of The Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire
TLDR
The results suggest that the Örebro Screening Questionnaire could be of value in isolating patients in need of early interventions and may promote the use of appropriate interventions for patients with psychological risk factors.
Behavioural treatment for chronic low-back pain.
TLDR
Combined respondent-cognitive therapy and progressive relaxation therapy are more effective than WLC on short-term pain relief, however, it is unknown whether these results sustain in the long term.
Impact of Psychological Factors in the Experience of Pain
TLDR
The key psychological factors associated with the experience of pain are summarized, and an overview of how they have been integrated into the major models of pain and disability in the scientific literature is presented.
Development of a Short Form of the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire
TLDR
The short form of the ÖMSPQ is appropriate for clinical and research purposes, since it is nearly as accurate as the longer version.
Risk factors for neck and back pain in a working population in Sweden
TLDR
Lifting, monotonous work tasks, vibration and uncomfortable work postures were the most important ergonomie factors and not exercising and consuming alcohol did not increase the risk for these musculoskeletal pains.
Occupational Psychological Factors Increase the Risk for Back Pain: A Systematic Review
  • S. Linton
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
  • 1 March 2001
TLDR
It is concluded that psychological work factors play a significant role in future back pain problems, however, there is still a lack of knowledge concerning the mechanisms by which these operate.
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