• Publications
  • Influence
Dietary long-chain n-3 fatty acids for the prevention of cancer: a review of potential mechanisms.
TLDR
Several molecular mechanisms whereby n-3 fatty acids may modify the carcinogenic process have been proposed, and influences on transcription factor activity, gene expression, and signal transduction pathways; alteration of estrogen metabolism; increased or decreased production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species; and mechanisms involving insulin sensitivity and membrane fluidity are proposed. Expand
Diabetes mellitus and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.
TLDR
A meta-analysis of published data on the association between diabetes and the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer found that diabetes was associated with an increased risk of colors, compared with no diabetes, and these results were consistent between case-control and cohort studies and between studies conducted in the United States and in Europe. Expand
Meat consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: A meta‐analysis of prospective studies
TLDR
Results of this meta‐analysis of prospective studies support the hypothesis that high consumption of red meat and of processed meat is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Expand
Red meat consumption and risk of cancers of the proximal colon, distal colon and rectum: The Swedish Mammography Cohort
TLDR
High consumption of red meat may substantially increase the risk of distal colon cancer, and future investigations on red meat and colorectal cancer risk should consider cancer subsites separately. Expand
Diabetes mellitus and risk of breast cancer: A meta‐analysis
TLDR
A meta‐analysis of case–control and cohort studies indicates that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Expand
Obesity and colon and rectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.
  • S. Larsson, A. Wolk
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 1 September 2007
TLDR
The association between obesity and colon and rectal cancer risk varies by sex and cancer site, and the difference in RRs between cancer sites was statistically significant. Expand
Folate intake, MTHFR polymorphisms, and risk of esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.
TLDR
Findings support the hypothesis that folate may play a role in carcinogenesis of the esophagus, stomach, and pancreas. Expand
Overweight, obesity and risk of liver cancer: a meta-analysis of cohort studies
TLDR
This meta-analysis finds that excess body weight is associated with an increased risk of liver cancer and that overweight and obesity are associated with this risk. Expand
Physical activity, obesity, and risk of colon and rectal cancer in a cohort of Swedish men.
TLDR
A role of physical activity in reducing the risk of colon and rectal cancer is supported in a cohort of Swedish men and home/housework activity was inversely associated with colon cancer risk. Expand
Body mass index and pancreatic cancer risk: A meta‐analysis of prospective studies
TLDR
Findings from this meta‐analysis of prospective studies support a positive association between BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer in men and women. Expand
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