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The life-cycle of Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) parasitizing Darwin's finches and its impacts on nestling survival
TLDR
All larval instars for the first time are described, and infection intensity and impacts of parasitism on nestling survival of Darwin's finches are discussed, highlighting the extremely serious threat this parasite poses for the endemic passerine fauna of the Galápagos Islands. Expand
An experimental study on the effects of an introduced parasite in Darwin's finches.
TLDR
A single insecticide treatment was sufficient to reduce parasite intensity to nearly zero, and revealed reduced mass gain and reduced fledging success in parasitized nests compared to parasite-reduced nests, in the first experimental study of fitness impacts by Philornis on its host species. Expand
Philornis downsi parasitism is the primary cause of nestling mortality in the critically endangered Darwin’s medium tree finch (Camarhynchus pauper)
TLDR
It is found that parasite intensity would increase with finch body size, and with greater rainfall, and would also correlate with increased nestling mortality, and a trend in the expected direction for parasite intensity and rainfall was found. Expand
Interannual and interspecific variation in intensity of the parasitic fly, Philornis downsi, in Darwin’s finches
TLDR
Surprisingly, despite a threefold difference in rainfall across lowland and highland habitats in other than the El Nino year, there was no difference in parasite intensity per nest between habitats, however, species composition of hosts and intraspecific brood size vary across habitats. Expand
Avian nest defence behaviour: assessment in relation to predator distance and type, and nest height
TLDR
Nest defence was stronger at low nests to ground predators and at high nests to the aerial predator, and there were combined interaction effects for predator type × nest height in relation to predator distance; for example, nest height was negatively related to nest defence to snakes, but only for snakes close to the nest. Expand
Population trend alters the effects of maternal dominance rank on lifetime reproductive success in yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus)
TLDR
The majority of rank effects on measures of Lifetime reproductive success were virtually eliminated for mothers reproducing during the troop decline, indicating that the considerable impacts of social status on lifetime reproductive success can be markedly altered by intrinsically and extrinsically mediated demographic events. Expand
Effects of the parasitic flies of the genus Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on birds
TLDR
The impetus for this review is the recent discovery of Philornis downsi on the Galapagos Archipelago, combined with high PhilORNis-induced mortality in Darwin's finches, highlighting the potential for ectoparasites such as PhilornIS to compromise the viability of small, isolated bird populations. Expand
Alarm calls and chick reactions in the moustached warbler, Acrocephalus melanopogon
TLDR
The results suggest that the anti-predator response of chicks is the proximate cue for adult alarm calls in moustached warblers. Expand
Video analysis of host–parasite interactions in nests of Darwin’s finches
TLDR
In nests with high parasite intensity, nestlings increased self-preening behaviour, ate larvae and stood on top of one another, shedding light on the emergence of anti-parasite behaviour as well as host–parasites relationships after recent parasitism in a naïve host. Expand
Ticks (Ixodes sp.) and blood parasites (Haemoproteus spp.) in New Holland Honeyeaters (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae): evidence for site specificity and fitness costs
TLDR
Preliminary evidence for a geographical pattern of tick (Ixodes sp.) distribution is provided: ticks are found on Kangaroo Island and in a coastal area of the Fleurieu Peninsula, but not at sites more inland within the Mount Lofty Ranges. Expand
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