• Publications
  • Influence
Forgotten person in the Huntington disease family.
  • S. Kessler
  • Medicine
    American journal of medical genetics
  • 15 October 1993
Although spouses play a major role in managing the care of persons affected with Huntington disease (HD), often at the price of subordinating their own aspirations and needs, little or no
Psychological Aspects of Genetic Counseling. IX. Teaching and Counseling
  • S. Kessler
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of Genetic Counseling
  • 1 September 1997
TLDR
Greater attention needs to be given by training programs to the pedagogical and counseling skills genetic counselors may need in their professional work.
The psychological paradigm shift in genetic counseling.
TLDR
The shift to a more psychological paradigm has important philosophical and practical implications, and some of these are discussed around the issues of genetic education, communication, decision‐making, and the provision of supportive counseling.
Psychological aspects of genetic counseling. XI. Nondirectiveness revisited.
  • S. Kessler
  • Psychology, Medicine
    American journal of medical genetics
  • 17 October 1997
TLDR
It is suggested that many, if not most, problems involving the issue of nondirectiveness arise because of inadequacies in applying basic counseling skills.
Predictive testing for Huntington disease: a psychologist's view.
  • S. Kessler
  • Medicine
    American journal of medical genetics
  • 15 September 1994
Psychological aspects of genetic counseling. VIII. Suffering and countertransference
  • S. Kessler
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of Genetic Counseling
  • 1 December 1992
Two common forms of countertransferential problems seen in genetic counseling, associative and projective, are described and illustrated. Both forms have the potential of reducing the quality of
Genetic counseling is directive? Look again.
  • S. Kessler
  • Psychology, Medicine
    American journal of human genetics
  • 1 August 1997
Psychological aspects of genetic counseling. VII. Thoughts on directiveness
  • S. Kessler
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of Genetic Counseling
  • 1 March 1992
Directiveness and nondirectiveness in genetic counseling are poorly understood on the operational level, and information about what counselors allege they do and what actually is done in practice is
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