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Unique cellular interaction of silver nanoparticles: size-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species.
TLDR
A size-dependent toxicity was produced by silver nanoparticles, and one predominant mechanism of toxicity was found to be largely mediated through oxidative stress.
In vitro toxicity of nanoparticles in BRL 3A rat liver cells.
Characterization of nanomaterial dispersion in solution prior to in vitro exposure using dynamic light scattering technique.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that many metal and metal oxide nanomaterials agglomerate in solution and that depending upon the solution particleagglomeration is either agitated or mitigated.
In vitro cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian germline stem cells.
TLDR
The suitability of a mouse spermatogonial stem cell line as a model to assess nanotoxicity in the male germline in vitro is assessed and it is suggested that this cell line provides a valuable model with which to assess the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in the germ line in vitro.
Silver nanoparticles disrupt GDNF/Fyn kinase signaling in spermatogonial stem cells.
TLDR
The data revealed that already at a concentration of 10 microg/ml, silver nanoparticles specifically interact with Fyn kinase downstream of Ret and impair SSC proliferation in vitro, and it was demonstrated that the particle coating was degraded upon interaction with the intracellular microenvironment, reducing biocompatibility.
Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?
TLDR
Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types, and results suggest that nandiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range ofcell types.
Surface charge of gold nanoparticles mediates mechanism of toxicity.
TLDR
Results indicate that surface charge is a major determinant of how Au NPs impact cellular processes, with the charged NPs inducing cell death through apoptosis and neutral NPs leading to necrosis.
The interaction of manganese nanoparticles with PC-12 cells induces dopamine depletion.
TLDR
Results clearly demonstrate that nanoscale manganese can deplete DA, DOPAC, and HVA in a dose-dependent manner and further study is required to evaluate the specific intracellular distribution of Mn-40 nm nanoparticles, metal dissolution rates in cells and cellular matrices, and the propensity of Mn nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier or be selectively uptaken by nasal epithelium.
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