• Publications
  • Influence
The Biology and Preliminary Host Range of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) and Its Impact on Kudzu Growth
ABSTRACT The bean plataspid, Megacopta cribraria (F.), recently was discovered in the United States feeding on kudzu, Pueraria montana Lour. (Merr.) variety lobata (Willd.), an economically importantExpand
  • 77
  • 23
  • PDF
Changes in fire regimes since the Last Glacial Maximum: an assessment based on a global synthesis and analysis of charcoal data
Fire activity has varied globally and continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM) in response to long-term changes in global climate and shorter-term regional changes in climate, vegetation,Expand
  • 540
  • 18
  • PDF
Chinese Privet (Ligustrum sinense) Removal and its Effect on Native Plant Communities of Riparian Forests
Abstract Chinese privet is a major invasive shrub within riparian zones throughout the southeastern United States. We removed privet shrubs from four riparian forests in October 2005 with a Gyrotrac®Expand
  • 67
  • 14
  • PDF
Have changing forests conditions contributed to pollinator decline in the southeastern United States
Two conservation goals of the early 20th century, extensive reforestation and reduced wildfire through fire exclusion, may have contributed to declining pollinator abundance as forests became denserExpand
  • 36
  • 6
  • PDF
Conserving Pollinators in North American Forests: A Review
ABSTRACT: Bees and butterflies generally favor open forest habitats regardless of forest type, geographic region, or methods used to create these habitats. Dense shrub layers of native or nonnativeExpand
  • 49
  • 4
  • PDF
Impacts of removing Chinese privet from riparian forests on plant communities and tree growth five years later.
An invasive shrub, Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense Lour.), was removed from heavily infested riparian forests in the Georgia Piedmont in 2005 by mulching machine or chainsaw felling. SubsequentExpand
  • 22
  • 4
  • PDF
Spatial and temporal patterns of beetles associated with coarse woody debris in managed bottomland hardwood forests.
For. Ecol. and Mgt. 199:259-272. Malaise traps were used to sample beetles in artificial canopy gaps of different size (0.13 ha, 0.26 ha, and0.50 ha) and age in a South Carolina bottomland hardwoodExpand
  • 59
  • 4
  • PDF
Removing an invasive shrub (Chinese privet) increases native bee diversity and abundance in riparian forests of the southeastern United States
Abstract.  1. Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense Lour.) was removed from riparian forests in the Piedmont of Georgia in November 2005 by mulching with a track‐mounted mulching machine or by chainsawExpand
  • 58
  • 3
  • PDF
Effect of Trap Type, Trap Position, Time of Year, and Beetle Density on Captures of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)
ABSTRACT The exotic redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and its fungal symbiont Raffaellea lauricola Harrington, Fraedrich, and Aghayeva areExpand
  • 36
  • 3
  • PDF
Seasonal diets of insectivorous birds using canopy gaps in a bottomland forest
Little is known about how insectivorous bird diets are influenced by arthropod availability and about how these relationships vary seasonally. We captured birds in forest-canopy gaps and adjacentExpand
  • 37
  • 3
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
5
...