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Biogeographic Evolution of Madagascar's Microendemic Biota
TLDR
An analysis of watersheds in the context of Quaternary climatic shifts provides a new mechanistic model to explain the process of explosive speciation on Madagascar and provides a framework for biogeographic and phylogeographic studies, as well as a basis for prioritizing conservation actions of the remaining natural forest habitats on the island.
A chronology for late prehistoric Madagascar.
Single origin of Malagasy Carnivora from an African ancestor
TLDR
A multi-gene phylogenetic analysis is used to show that Malagasy carnivorans are monophyletic and thus the product of a single colonization of Madagascar by an African ancestor, and that a single event cannot explain the presence of both groups in Madagascar.
Taxonomic Revision of Mouse Lemurs (Microcebus) in the Western Portions of Madagascar
TLDR
Seven species of Microcebus from western Madagascar are recognized, including a previously synonymized species, and 3 spp.
The Natural History of Madagascar
Separated from the mainland of Africa for 160 million years, Madagascar has evolved an incredible wealth of biodiversity, with thousands of species that can be found nowhere else on earth. For
Updated estimates of biotic diversity and endemism for Madagascar
TLDR
Biodiversity information presented in the volume is summarized by providing revised estimates of species richness, endemism, and state of knowledge of a wide variety of taxonomic groups occurring on the island.
African apes as reservoirs of Plasmodium falciparum and the origin and diversification of the Laverania subgenus
TLDR
Two mitochondrial genes, one plastid gene, and one nuclear gene are investigated in blood samples from 12 chimpanzees and two gorillas from Cameroon and one lemur from Madagascar, suggesting that the falciparum + ape parasite cluster (Laverania clade) may have evolved from a parasite present in hosts not ancestral to the primates.
Remarkable species diversity in Malagasy mouse lemurs (primates, Microcebus).
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequence data confirms the observation that species diversity in the world's smallest living primate (genus Microcebus) has been greatly underestimated and revises established hypotheses of ecogeographic constraint for the maintenance of species boundaries in these endemic Malagasy primates.
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