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Social dominance and stress hormones
TLDR
The findings that elevated GCs can be a consequence of subordination or a cost of dominance complicate the conventional view of social stress, with broad ramifications for the evolution of dominance and reproductive suppression.
Relationships between direct predation and risk effects.
TLDR
Studies of predation in vertebrate conservation and management usually consider only direct predation, but given the ubiquity and strength of behavioral responses to predators by vertebrate prey, it is not safe to assume that risk effects on dynamics can be ignored.
Elk alter habitat selection as an antipredator response to wolves
TLDR
The data support a central portion of the hypothesis that elk antipredator behavior could drive a trophic cascade in the Yellowstone ecosystem, but changes in elk numbers are also likely to have affected elk-plant interactions.
Snowmobile activity and glucocorticoid stress responses in wolves and elk
TLDR
Immunoassays of fecal glucocorticoid levels provide a sensitive and noninvasive method of measuring the physiological stress responses of wildlife to disturbances and there was no evidence that current levels of snowmobile activity are affecting the population dynamics of either species in these locations.
The ecology of stress: effects of the social environment
TLDR
The relationship between dominance and glucocorticoid levels varies among species, populations and years, in a manner that depends on the stability of the social hierarchy, environmental conditions, the type of breeding system and the manner in which high rank is obtained and maintained.
Predation Risk Affects Reproductive Physiology and Demography of Elk
TLDR
Together, data suggest that wolves indirectly affect the reproductive physiology and the demography of elk through the costs of antipredator behavior.
Population size estimation in Yellowstone wolves with error‐prone noninvasive microsatellite genotypes
TLDR
A ‘matching approach’ is proposed to eliminate overestimation of population size in wolves in Yellowstone National Park by counting distinct microsatellite genotypes from noninvasive samples, which is essential for conservation.
Four Factors Modifying the Effect of Competition on Carnivore Population Dynamics as Illustrated by African Wild Dogs
TLDR
Four complexities that can modify the effects of competition on the population dynamics of carnivores are highlighted: habitat fragmentation, counterintuitive effects of prey density, predator-prey size ratios, and habitat type.
DOMINANCE, AGGRESSION, AND GLUCOCORTICOID LEVELS IN SOCIAL CARNIVORES
TLDR
Relationships between rank, aggression, and GCs from field studies of 3 cooperatively breeding carnivores: the dwarf mongoose, the African wild dog, and the gray wolf are summarized, showing patterns observed in these carnivores are emerging as typical for cooperative breeders.
Responses of elk herd size to fine-scale spatial and temporal variation in the risk of predation by wolves
TLDR
It was found that elk herd size increased as distance to protective cover increased, which suggests that aggregation far from cover on days that wolves were absent was a foraging response, rather than an antipredator response.
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