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Human brain imaging has revealed that acute pain results from activation of a network of brain regions, including the somatosensory, insular, prefrontal, and cingulate cortices. In contrast, many investigations report little or no alteration in brain activity associated with chronic pain, particularly neuropathic pain. It has been hypothesized that(More)
Trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are thought to have fundamentally different etiologies. It has been proposed that TNP arises through damage to, or pressure on, somatosensory afferents in the trigeminal nerve, whereas TMD results primarily from peripheral nociceptor activation. Because some reports suggest that(More)
There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry, and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that(More)
UNLABELLED Trigeminal neuralgia, painful trigeminal neuropathy, and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are chronic orofacial pain conditions that are thought to have fundamentally different etiologies. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy are thought to arise from damage to or pressure on the trigeminal nerve, whereas TMD results primarily from(More)
The regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a complex integrated process that is critical for supporting healthy brain function. Studies have demonstrated a high incidence of alterations in CBF in patients suffering from migraine with and without aura during different phases of attacks. However, the CBF data collected interictally has failed to show any(More)
The degree to which neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain conditions differ in psychological and psychosocial status remains largely unexplored. A better understanding of these aspects would be of considerable benefit in helping to define whether similar psychological treatment strategies (eg, cognitive-behavioural therapy) can be adopted in the management(More)
Accumulated evidence from experimental animal models suggests that neuronal loss within the dorsal horn is involved in the development and/or maintenance of peripheral neuropathic pain. However, to date, no study has specifically investigated whether such neuroanatomical changes also occur at this level in humans. Using brain imaging techniques, we sought(More)
UNLABELLED For many years, neurobiological theories have emphasized the importance of neuronal oscillations in the emergence of brain function. At the same time, clinical studies have shown that disturbances or irregularities in brain rhythms may relate to various common neurological conditions, including migraine. Increasing evidence suggests that the CNS(More)
Pain is both an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. This is highly relevant in migraine where cortical hyperexcitability in response to sensory stimuli (including pain, light, and sound) has been extensively reported. However, migraine may feature a more general enhanced response to aversive stimuli rather than being sensory-specific. To this end(More)
Accumulated evidence from experimental animal models suggests that neuroplastic changes at the dorsal horn are critical for the maintenance of various chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. However, to date, no study has specifically investigated whether neuroplastic changes also occur at this level in humans. Using brain imaging techniques, we sought to(More)
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