Sébastian Amigorena

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Exosomes are small membrane vesicles found in cell culture supernatants and in different biological fluids. Exosomes form in a particular population of endosomes, called multivesicular bodies (MVBs), by inward budding into the lumen of the compartment. Upon fusion of MVBs with the plasma membrane, these internal vesicles are secreted. Exosomes possess a(More)
Conventional cancer treatments rely on radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Such treatments supposedly mediate their effects via the direct elimination of tumor cells. Here we show that the success of some protocols for anticancer therapy depends on innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses. We describe in both mice and humans a previously unrecognized(More)
Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are secreted by most cells in culture. Interest in exosomes has intensified after their recent description in antigen-presenting cells and the observation that they can stimulate immune responses in vivo. In the past few years, several groups have reported the secretion of exosomes by various(More)
Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that share structural and biochemical characteristics with intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). Exosomes could be involved in intercellular communication and in the pathogenesis of infectious and degenerative diseases. The molecular mechanisms of exosome biogenesis and secretion are, however,(More)
Dendritic cells constitutively secrete a population of small (50-90 nm diameter) Ag-presenting vesicles called exosomes. When sensitized with tumor antigenic peptides, dendritic cells produce exosomes, which stimulate anti-tumor immune responses and the rejection of established tumors in mice. Using a systematic proteomic approach, we establish the first(More)
Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells with the unique capacity to induce primary and secondary immune responses in vivo. Here, we show that DCs secrete antigen presenting vesicles, called exosomes, which express functional Major Histocompatibility Complex class I and class II, and T-cell costimulatory molecules. Tumor(More)
Dendritic cells take up antigens in peripheral tissues, process them into proteolytic peptides, and load these peptides onto major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Dendritic cells then migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and become competent to present antigens to T lymphocytes, thus initiating antigen-specific immune responses,(More)
The presentation of exogenous antigens on MHC class I molecules, known as cross-presentation, is essential for the initiation of CD8+ T cell responses. In vivo, cross-presentation is mainly carried out by specific dendritic cell (DC) subsets through an adaptation of their endocytic and phagocytic pathways. Here, we summarize recent advances in our(More)
The initiation of T-cell–mediated antitumor immune responses requires the uptake and processing of tumor antigens by dendritic cells and their presentation on MHC-I molecules. Here we show in a human in vitro model system that exosomes, a population of small membrane vesicles secreted by living tumor cells, contain and transfer tumor antigens to dendritic(More)
To initiate adaptative cytotoxic immune responses, proteolytic peptides derived from phagocytosed antigens are presented by dendritic cells (DCs) to CD8+ T lymphocytes through a process called antigen "crosspresentation." The partial degradation of antigens mediated by lysosomal proteases in an acidic environment must be tightly controlled to prevent(More)