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Axonal damage is considered the major cause of irreversible disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Which mechanisms underlie the damage and whether this is secondary to myelin damage remains to be clarified. Recently, we have demonstrated that autoimmunity to the axonal/neuronal cytoskeletal protein neurofilament light (NF-L) induces axonal damage and(More)
Neuroaxonal degeneration is a pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) contributing to irreversible neurological disability. Pathological mechanisms leading to axonal damage include autoimmunity to neuronal antigens. In actively demyelinating lesions, myelin is phagocytosed by microglia and blood-borne macrophages, whereas the fate of degenerating(More)
Axonal damage is the major cause of irreversible neurologic disability in patients with multiple sclerosis. Although axonal damage correlates with antibodies against neurofilament light (NF-L) protein, a major component of the axonal cytoskeleton, the possible pathogenic role of autoimmunity to axonal antigens such as NF-L has so far been ignored. Here we(More)
For many years, loss of myelin was considered to be the major cause of neurological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. This 'myelinocentric' view of MS was revised recently, after recognition that axonal damage, rather than demyelination, provides a better correlate to(More)
BACKGROUND Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a post-infectious polyradiculoneuropathy, frequently associated with antecedent Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) infection. The presence of sialic acid on C. jejuni lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) is considered a risk factor for development of GBS as it crucially determines the structural homology between LOS and(More)
OBJECTIVE Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a postinfectious neuropathy most frequently caused by Campylobacter jejuni. Lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS), expressed by C. jejuni induce antibodies that cross-react with self-glycolipids in peripheral nerves, causing neuropathy. Less than 1 in 1,000 persons infected with C. jejuni develop GBS, and the factors that(More)
OBJECTIVE Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute postinfectious immune-mediated polyneuropathy. Although preceding respiratory tract infections with Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported in some cases, the role of M. pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of GBS remains unclear. We here cultured, for the first time, M. pneumoniae from a GBS patient with(More)
Treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome with a standard course of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) results in a variable clinical recovery which is associated with changes in serum IgG levels after treatment. The neonatal Fc-receptor protects IgG from degradation, and a genetic polymorphism in its promoter region that influences the expression of(More)
  • F Puentes, Bj Van Der Star, M Victor, M Kipp, C Beyer, R Peferoen-Baert +20 others
  • 2016
Information about this research object was correct at the time of download; we occasionally make corrections to records, please therefore check the published record when citing. For Abstract Background: Autoimmunity to neuronal proteins occurs in several neurological syndromes, where cellular and humoral responses are directed to surface as well as(More)
Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) products from different pharmaceutical companies vary in composition, in part because of the selected blood donors and production process. N-glycosylation of the Fc-portion of IgG varies between blood donors and may influence both the side-effects and therapeutic effectiveness of IVIg. At present, the variation in Fc(More)