Russell K. Durbin

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Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of severe lower airway disease in infants and young children, but no safe and effective RSV vaccine is yet available. The difficulties involved in RSV vaccine development were recognized in an early vaccine trial, when children immunized with a formalin-inactivated virus preparation experienced enhanced(More)
The role of prostanoids in modulating respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is unknown. We found that RSV infection in mice increases production of prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)). Mice that overexpress PGI(2) synthase selectively in bronchial epithelium are protected against RSV-induced weight loss and have decreased peak viral replication and gamma(More)
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly. While the primary infection is the most serious, reinfection of the upper airway throughout life is the rule. Although relatively little is known about either RSV infection of the upper respiratory tract or host mucosal immunity to RSV,(More)
Type I (IFN-α/β) and type III (IFN-λ) interferons (IFNs) exert shared antiviral activities through distinct receptors. However, their relative importance for antiviral protection of different organ systems against specific viruses remains to be fully explored. We used mouse strains deficient in type-specific IFN signaling, STAT1 and Rag2 to dissect distinct(More)
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