Rudy L. Horne

Learn More
Data on the hypnotizability of 113 psychiatric inpatients and 58 normal control subjects were compared. The patients' mean score on the Hypnotic Induction Profile was significantly lower than that of the control subjects, but on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C, these patients and control subjects did not differ significantly. On both(More)
Hypnotizability was assessed with the use of three standardized hypnosis scales in 86 patients with eating disorders. All diagnoses were made according to DSM-III criteria. Sixty-five patients had anorexia nervosa and 21 had bulimia. The anorectic patients were divided into subgroups of 19 abstainers and 46 vomiters and purgers. Bulimic patients were highly(More)
In two studies, 145 psychiatric inpatients were each asked to say 100 numbers in random order, using the numbers 1 through 10. Compared with normative data, patients with personality disorders and neuroses were not impaired on the random number generation (RNG) task and patients with chronic alcoholism and primary affective disorder, depression, were(More)
OBJECTIVE The authors attempt to answer the question of whether patients with eating disorders experience more distortions in body image than do individuals without eating disorders. METHOD The study group was composed of 214 women out of 230 patients consecutively admitted to an inpatient eating disorders program. Twelve men and four patients with(More)
In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study of the unique antidepressant agent bupropion in the treatment of nondepressed subjects with bulimia (bupropion group, N = 55; placebo group, N = 26), we found the drug significantly superior to placebo in reducing episodes of binge eating and purging. In general, side effects with bupropion were minimal. However,(More)
Dexamethasone, compared to placebo in a double-blind study, failed to prevent the memory deficiency that typically accompanies electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) (n = 48 patients treated for DSM-III diagnosed major depressive disorder). Rather, the administration of the drug was associated with attention (p less than 0.02) and short-term memory (p less than(More)
In a double-blind study, 48 DSM-III depressed patients were randomly assigned to either the bilateral or nondominant unilateral electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) group. Seizure length was monitored by electroencephalography (EEG). When seizures were less than 25 s, ECT was immediately readministered. When length of seizure and pretreatment depression scores(More)
  • 1