Learn More
A major pathway of eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover begins with deadenylation, followed by decapping and 5' to 3' exonucleolytic decay. We provide evidence that mRNA decapping and 5' to 3' degradation occur in discrete cytoplasmic foci in yeast, which we call processing bodies (P bodies). First, proteins that activate or catalyze decapping are(More)
In animals, the majority of microRNAs regulate gene expression through the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery without inducing small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-directed mRNA cleavage. Thus, the mechanisms by which microRNAs repress their targets have remained elusive. Recently, Argonaute proteins, which are key RNAi effector components, and their target mRNAs(More)
Small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) can silence target genes through several different effector mechanisms. Whereas siRNA-directed mRNA cleavage is increasingly understood, the mechanisms by which miRNAs repress protein synthesis are obscure. Recent studies have revealed the existence of specific cytoplasmic foci,(More)
Translation and mRNA degradation are affected by a key transition where eukaryotic mRNAs exit translation and assemble an mRNP state that accumulates into processing bodies (P bodies), cytoplasmic sites of mRNA degradation containing non-translating mRNAs, and mRNA degradation machinery. We identify the decapping activators Dhh1p and Pat1p as functioning as(More)
Processing bodies (P-bodies) are cytoplasmic RNA granules that contain translationally repressed messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) and messenger RNA (mRNA) decay factors. The physical interactions that form the individual mRNPs within P-bodies and how those mRNPs assemble into larger P-bodies are unresolved. We identify direct protein interactions that(More)
All RNA species in yeast cells are subject to turnover. Work over the past 20 years has defined degradation mechanisms for messenger RNAs, transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, and noncoding RNAs. In addition, numerous quality control mechanisms that target aberrant RNAs have been identified. Generally, each decay mechanism contains factors that funnel RNA(More)
The major pathways of mRNA turnover in eukaryotes initiate with shortening of the poly(A) tail. We demonstrate by several criteria that CCR4 and CAF1 encode critical components of the major cytoplasmic deadenylase in yeast. First, both Ccr4p and Caf1p are required for normal mRNA deadenylation in vivo. Second, both proteins localize to the cytoplasm. Third,(More)
Recent results indicate that many untranslating mRNAs in somatic eukaryotic cells assemble into related mRNPs that accumulate in specific cytoplasmic foci referred to as P bodies. Transcripts associated with P body components can either be degraded or return to translation. Moreover, P bodies are also biochemically and functionally related to some maternal(More)
In eukaryotic cells, mRNAs are exquisitely controlled, often through regulatory elements in their 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Proteins that bind to those sites are key players in controlling mRNA stability, translation and localization. One family of regulatory proteins--the PUF proteins--are not only structurally related, but also bind to 3'UTRs and(More)