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We have investigated the in vivo growth kinetics of a Salmonella typhimurium strain (P11D10) carrying a mutation in ssaJ, a Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) gene encoding a component of a type III secretion system required for systemic growth in mice. Similar numbers of mutant and wild-type cells were recovered from the spleens and livers of BALB/c(More)
The type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for systemic infection of this pathogen in mice. Cloning and sequencing of a central region of SPI-2 revealed the presence of genes encoding putative chaperones and effector proteins of the secretion system. The predicted products of the sseB, sseC and sseD genes display(More)
The major classes of enteric bacteria harbour a conserved core genomic structure, common to both commensal and pathogenic strains, that is most likely optimized to a life style involving colonization of the host intestine and transmission via the environment. In pathogenic bacteria this core genome framework is decorated with novel genetic islands that are(More)
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli are extracellular pathogens that employ a type III secretion system to export translocator and effector proteins, proteins which facilitates colonization of the mucosal surface of the intestine via formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. The genes encoding the proteins for A/E(More)
Intimin is an outer-membrane adhesin that is essential for colonization of the host gastrointestinal tract by attaching and effacing pathogens including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and Citrobacter rodentium (CR). The N-terminus of intimin from the different strains is highly conserved while the C-terminus,(More)
Citrobacter rodentium is a member of a group of pathogens that colonize the lumen of the host gastrointestinal tract via attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion formation. C. rodentium, which causes transmissible colonic hyperplasia in mice, is used as an in vivo model system for the clinically significant A/E pathogens enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic(More)
Citrobacter rodentium is used as an in vivo model system for clinically significant enteric pathogens such as enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). These pathogens all colonize the lumen side of the host gastrointestinal tract via attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion formation. In order to identify genes required for(More)
The type III secretion system (TTSS) encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for bacterial replication inside macrophages and for systemic infection in mice. Many TTSS secreted proteins, including effectors and components of the translocon, require chaperones which promote their stability, prevent their premature interactions or(More)
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and Citrobacter rodentium (CR) colonize the gastrointestinal tract epithelium via attaching and effacing lesions. While humans are believed to be the only living reservoir of typical EPEC and EHEC to have border host specificity, CR is a restricted mouse pathogen. Recently,(More)