Rosa Bacchetta

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Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-secreting T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells are defined by their specific cytokine production profile, which includes the secretion of high levels of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta(TGF-beta), and by their ability to suppress antigen-specific effector T-cell responses via a cytokine-dependent mechanism. In contrast to the(More)
Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is currently thought to be the most specific marker for naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells (nTregs). In mice, expression of FoxP3 is strictly correlated with regulatory activity, whereas increasing evidence suggests that in humans, activated T effector cells (Teffs) may also express FOXP3. In order to better define(More)
BACKGROUND The hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections of the lung and skin, elevated serum IgE, and involvement of the soft and bony tissues. Recently, HIES has been associated with heterozygous dominant-negative mutations in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and severe reductions of(More)
Suppression by T regulatory (Tr) cells is essential for the induction of peripheral tolerance. Many types of CD4+ Tr cells have been described in a number of systems, and although the precise mechanisms which mediate their effects remain to be defined, it is well established that they can suppress immune responses via cell-cell interactions and/or the(More)
Suppression by T regulatory (Tr) cells is essential for induction of tolerance. Many types of Tr cells have been described in a number of systems, and their biology has been the subject of intensive investigation. Although many aspects of the mechanisms by which these cells exert their effects remain to be elucidated, it is well established that Tr cells(More)
CD4(+) type 1 T regulatory (Tr1) cells are induced in the periphery and have a pivotal role in promoting and maintaining tolerance. The absence of surface markers that uniquely identify Tr1 cells has limited their study and clinical applications. By gene expression profiling of human Tr1 cell clones, we identified the surface markers CD49b and lymphocyte(More)
Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes(More)
Peripheral tolerance is mediated by multiple mechanisms such as anergy and/or active suppression of effector T cells by T regulatory (Tr) cells. Among the CD4(+) Tr cells, T regulatory type 1 cells (Tr1) have been shown to down-modulate immune responses through production of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Tr1 cells maintain peripheral(More)
The autoimmune disease immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) is caused by mutations in the forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) gene. In the mouse model of FOXP3 deficiency, the lack of CD4+ CD25+ Tregs is responsible for lethal autoimmunity, indicating that FOXP3 is required for the differentiation of this Treg subset. We show(More)
Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is considered a specific marker for CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, but increasing evidence suggests that human CD4(+)CD25(-) effector T (Teff) cells can transiently express FOXP3 upon activation. We demonstrate that the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5)-signaling cytokines, IL-2, IL-15 and to a(More)