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1. Local changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] were imaged with a wide-field, high-speed, digital imaging system while membrane currents were simultaneously recorded using whole-cell, perforated patch recording in freshly dissociated guinea-pig tracheal myocytes. 2. Depending on membrane potential, Ca2+ sparks triggered 'spontaneous' transient inward currents(More)
Ca(2+) sparks are small, localized cytosolic Ca(2+) transients due to Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors. In smooth muscle, Ca(2+) sparks activate large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) in the spark microdomain, thus generating spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs). The purpose of the(More)
Short-lived, localized Ca(2+) events mediate Ca(2+) signaling with high efficiency and great fidelity largely as a result of the close proximity between Ca(2+)-permeable ion channels and their molecular targets. However, in most cases, direct evidence of the spatial relationship between these two types of molecules is lacking, and, thus, mechanistic(More)
Spontaneous, short-lived, focal cytosolic Ca2+ transients were found for the first time and characterized in freshly dissociated chromaffin cells from mouse. Produced by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and mediated by type 2 and perhaps type 3 ryanodine receptors (RyRs), these transients are quantitatively similar in magnitude and duration to Ca2+(More)
Localized, transient elevations in cytosolic Ca2+, known as Ca2+ sparks, caused by Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, are thought to trigger the opening of large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the plasma membrane resulting in spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) in smooth muscle cells. But the precise relationships between(More)
Ca2+ stores were studied in a preparation of freshly dissociated terminals from hypothalamic magnocellular neurons. Depolarization from a holding level of -80 mV in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ elicited Ca2+ release from intraterminal stores, a ryanodine-sensitive process designated as voltage-induced Ca2+ release (VICaR). The release took one of two(More)
Bronchodilators are a standard medicine for treating airway obstructive diseases, and β2 adrenergic receptor agonists have been the most commonly used bronchodilators since their discovery. Strikingly, activation of G-protein-coupled bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) in airway smooth muscle (ASM) causes a stronger bronchodilation in vitro and in vivo than β2(More)
Ca(2+) sparks are highly localized Ca(2+) transients caused by Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors (RyR). In smooth muscle, Ca(2+) sparks activate nearby large-conductance, Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (BK) channels to generate spontaneous transient outward currents (STOC). The properties of individual sites that give rise to(More)
A central concept in the physiology of neurosecretion is that a rise in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in the vicinity of plasmalemmal Ca(2+) channels due to Ca(2+) influx elicits exocytosis. Here, we examine the effect on spontaneous exocytosis of a rise in focal cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in the vicinity of ryanodine receptors (RYRs) due to release from internal stores in(More)
Ca2+ sparks are short lived and localized Ca2+ transients resulting from the opening of ryanodine receptors in sarcoplasmic reticulum. These events relax certain types of smooth muscle by activating big conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels to produce spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) and the resultant closure of voltage-dependent Ca2+(More)