Peter Oelhafen3
Christian Cajochen3
3Peter Oelhafen
3Christian Cajochen
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BACKGROUND Light exposure can cascade numerous effects on the human circadian process via the non-imaging forming system, whose spectral relevance is highest in the short-wavelength range. Here we investigated if commercially available compact fluorescent lamps with different colour temperatures can impact on alertness and cognitive performance. METHODS(More)
Light strongly influences the circadian timing system in humans via non-image-forming photoreceptors in the retinal ganglion cells. Their spectral sensitivity is highest in the short-wavelength range of the visible light spectrum as demonstrated by melatonin suppression, circadian phase shifting, acute physiological responses, and subjective alertness. We(More)
Light in the short wavelength range (blue light: 446-483 nm) elicits direct effects on human melatonin secretion, alertness and cognitive performance via non-image-forming photoreceptors. However, the impact of blue-enriched polychromatic light on human sleep architecture and sleep electroencephalographic activity remains fairly unknown. In this study we(More)
Recently, we showed that for traditional bidirec-tional search with "front-to-end" evaluations, it is not the meeting of search fronts but the cost of proving the optimality of a solution that is problematic. Using our improved understanding of the problem, we developed a new approach to improving this kind of search: switching to unidirectional search(More)
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