Roger I. Glass

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Five genetically distinct human rotavirus (HRV) gene 4 groups have been described on the basis of comparative nucleotide sequencing and the predicted amino acid sequences, and at least four of them represent distinct VP4 antigenic types. To identify each gene 4 type and investigate its distribution in HRV isolates from patients with diarrhea, we developed a(More)
The rotavirus gene segment coding for the major outer capsid glycoprotein vp7 was amplified directly from stool specimens by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Double-stranded RNA extracted from stool samples was used as the template for reverse transcription, which was followed immediately and in the same reaction mix with amplification, using the Taq(More)
To estimate the global illness and deaths caused by rotavirus disease, we reviewed studies published from 1986 to 2000 on deaths caused by diarrhea and on rotavirus infections in children. We assessed rotavirus-associated illness in three clinical settings (mild cases requiring home care alone, moderate cases requiring a clinic visit, and severe cases(More)
Without a virus culture system, genetic analysis becomes the principal method to classify norovirus (NoV) strains. Currently, classification of NoV strains beneath the species level has been based on sequences from different regions of the viral genome. As a result, the phylogenetic insights of some virus were not appropriately interpreted, and no consensus(More)
We conducted a systematic review of studies that used reverse transcription-PCR to diagnose norovirus (NoV) infections in patients with mild or moderate (outpatient) and severe (hospitalized) diarrhea. NoVs accounted for 12%(95% confidence interval [CI] 10%-15%) of severe gastroenteritis cases among children <5 years of age and 12% (95% CI 9%-15%) of mild(More)
Between 1986 and 1993, 72% of rotavirus strains isolated from newborns at five hospitals in New Delhi, India, had long electropherotypes, subgroup II VP6 antigens, and G and P genotypes (G9P11) identical to those of prototype strain 116E. A novel strain with a G9P6 genotype, representing 13% of the isolates, was identified. These results demonstrate that(More)
Studies published between 1986 and 1999 indicated that rotavirus causes approximately 22% (range 17%-28%) of childhood diarrhea hospitalizations. From 2000 to 2004, this proportion increased to 39% (range 29%-45%). Application of this proportion to the recent World Health Organization estimates of diarrhea-related childhood deaths gave an estimated 611,000(More)
The development of rotavirus vaccines that are based on heterotypic or serotype-specific immunity has prompted many countries to establish programs to assess the disease burden associated with rotavirus infection and the distribution of rotavirus strains. Strain surveillance helps to determine whether the most prevalent local strains are likely to be(More)
From the Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (R.I.G.); the Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta (R.I.G., U.D.P.); and Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (M.K.E.).(More)
BACKGROUND Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in infants. To provide a base line for assessing the efficacy of rotavirus vaccines, we evaluated the protection that is conferred by natural rotavirus infection. METHODS We monitored 200 Mexican infants from birth to two years of age by weekly home visits and stool collections. A physician(More)