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Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli. This anticarcinogen was first identified as a potent inducer of Phase 2 enzymes, but evidence is mounting that SFN acts through other cancer chemopreventive mechanisms. We recently reported on a novel mechanism of chemoprotection by SFN in human colon cancer cells and(More)
Cruciferous vegetables are a rich source of glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products, including indoles and isothiocyanates, and high intake of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with lower risk of lung and colorectal cancer in some epidemiological studies. Glucosinolate hydrolysis products alter the metabolism or activity of sex hormones in(More)
Sulforaphane (SFN), a compound found at high levels in broccoli and broccoli sprouts, is a potent inducer of phase 2 detoxification enzymes and inhibits tumorigenesis in animal models. SFN also has a marked effect on cell cycle checkpoint controls and cell survival and/or apoptosis in various cancer cells, through mechanisms that are poorly understood. We(More)
Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate first isolated from broccoli, exhibits chemopreventive properties in prostate cancer cells through mechanisms that are poorly understood. We recently reported on a novel mechanism of chemoprotection by SFN in human colon cancer cells, namely the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Here, we show that addition of 15(More)
Cancer is a multi-factorial process involving genetic and epigenetic events which result in neoplastic transformation. Reversal of aberrant epigenetic events, including those that modulate the transcriptional activity of genes associated with various signaling pathways, holds the prospect of influencing multiple stages of tumorigenesis. Perturbation of(More)
In cancer cells, an imbalance often exists between histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities, and various drug companies are actively seeking competitive HDAC inhibitors for chemotherapeutic intervention. Cancer cells appear to be more sensitive than nontransformed cells to HDAC inhibitors, which disrupt the cell cycle and(More)
To determine if 6 weeks of supplementation with antioxidants could alleviate exercise-induced DNA damage, we studied 21 runners during a 50 km ultramarathon. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) placebos (PL) or (2) antioxidants (AO) (1000 mg vitamin C and 400 IU RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate). The comet assay was used to assess DNA(More)
Rainbow trout, a species highly sensitive to aflatoxins, was used to investigate the relative carcinogenicities of four structurally related aflatoxins in terms of their target organ DNA binding characteristics. Tritiated syntheses were carried out, DNA binding dose-response curves were established, and liver DNA binding indices were calculated for the four(More)
Isothiocyanates are found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage. Epidemiologic studies suggest that cruciferous vegetable intake may lower overall cancer risk, including colon and prostate cancer. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables and is especially high in broccoli and(More)
There is growing interest in the potential health benefits of tea, including the antimutagenic properties. Four varieties of white tea, which represent the least processed form of tea, were shown to have marked antimutagenic activity in the Salmonella assay, particularly in the presence of S9. The most active of these teas, Exotica China white tea, was(More)